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Human Services (HS)

HS 100  Family and Human Services  (3)  

This course provides an introduction to the philosophical framework, major theoretical models, and interdisciplinary nature of family and human services. Students will examine various approaches to family and human services within historical, societal, and cultural contexts. Students will explore occupations, professional organizations, and community resources relevant to family and human services. Students will complete a 30 hour service learning project in a relevant agency in their own community. Prerequisite: None

HS 131  Human Development  (3)  

This course provides an introduction to physical, sexual, cognitive, emotional, social and spiritual aspects of human development throughout the lifespan.  It emphasizes developmental processes beginning with conception and continuing throughout childhood, adolescence, adulthood, later life and death.  The course focuses on developmental processes within the domains of individual wellness, human sexuality, family issues, and cultural contexts.  This course takes an interdisciplinary approach toward human development that is based on science and applied toward the goal of supporting individuals and families in solving important human problems. Prerequisite: None.

HS 201  Victimology  (3)  

This course provides an introduction to the history, development, theories, and major issues in the study of persons who are victims/survivors of crime. Using an ecological perspective of victimization, specific areas will be discussed, including domestic violence, sexual assault, child abuse, and homicide. Current research data will be discussed to enhance the understanding of victim trauma and recovery. Prerequisite: None,

HS 202  Victim/Survivor Services  (3)  

This course is an overview of the variety of human services provided to persons who are victims/survivors of crime. Settings to be studied are various criminal justice, medical, legal, crisis intervention, and advocacy agencies, and organizations that provide victim assistance. Emphasis is on current developments in the field. Prerequisite: None.

HS 220  Community Methods with Children & Youth  (3)  

This course is designed to introduce students interested in working with youth to the developmental and socialization influences that affect children. In addition, when one is concerned about children’s development, one must also be concerned with children, families, and communities. This course will provide students the opportunity to become sensitized to the many issues that confront today’s youth and critically look at what is being done. Many current topics will be covered in a survey format and students will investigate one topic in-depth. Prerequisite: None,

HS 221  Community Methods with Children & Youth  (3)  

This course will address environmental intervention with children and their families. Social networking and ecologically oriented programs will be the focus. Prerequisite: HS 220 or consent.

HS 222  Juvenile Justice  (3)  

The American system of juvenile justice, including the roles and relationships of law enforcement, courts, probation and parole, diversionary programs, service agencies, and correctional institutions. Prerequisite: None.

HS 231  Methods of Long Term Mental Health Care  (3)  

This course will build on the theoretical issues of basic health care, with emphasis on acquiring the skills to care for the health and safety concerns of people in long-term treatment programs. Prerequisite: None.

HS 232  Introduction to Community Mental Health Services  (3)  

This course is designed to familiarize students with the history and development of community mental health; federal, state and local policies impacting the delivery of community mental health services; and methods utilized in community mental health service delivery such as short-term counseling, crisis intervention, case management, prevention, education, and assessment of need for services. Prerequisite: None.

HS 240  Introduction to Intellectual Disabilities  (3)  

This is a survey course designed to introduce the student to a philosophy and set of practices for providing services to people with intellectual disabilities. Course topics include rights of individuals, legal issues, assessment and planning, communication, prevention, and supportive services for promoting independence and well-being. The course focuses on practical skill development for working with people with intellectual disabilities. Prerequisite: None.

HS 243  Fundamentals of American Sign Language  (3)  

This course is designed to provide students with a basic framework of knowledge regarding the nature of hearing loss and its extremely varied influence on the lives of people who are deaf, hard of hearing, late-deafened, and deaf with a dual diagnosis. Important issues within the field of deafness will be addressed, namely: Deaf culture, education of deaf people, technological advances, and political influences. Emphasis will be placed on learning the fundamentals of American Sign Language (ASL) while providing the student with a working vocabulary of approximately 500 signs. The student can expect sign demonstration and practice as well as lecture on various salient topics in deafness.

HS 250  Skills for Helping Professionals  (3)  

This course is designed to address foundational skills and techniques for providing family and human services. Students will engage in assignments to aid in their preparation for human services practice at the internship level. This course will explore ethics and professional conduct, goal setting, behavior-change strategies, communication skills, and relationships built on respect, compassion, and responsibility. Students will consider how values and biases influence helping. Special consideration will be given to understanding and working with diverse populations. Prerequisite: None,

HS 260  Directed Study  (1-3)  

Family and Human Services majors may pursue an independent study project if approved by the instructor in consultation with the Department Chair. A contract must be signed by all parties that specifies learning outcomes, assignments, deadlines, and assessment strategies. Independent Study courses must meet equivalencies to Federal definition of a credit hour. Prerequisite: Consent

HS 273  Gerontology Skills & Methods  (3)  

This course will allow students to build skills for delivering human services to elderly individuals and groups. Coursework will emphasize building relationships, assessment, and approaches to treatment. Prerequisite: None.

HS 290  Special Topics/Human Services  (1-3)  

Topics will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in advance.

HS 300  Prevention and Social Change  (3)  

This course will examine the foundational roles of prevention and social change in Family and Human Services. Content will focus on selection and implementation of social change and prevention strategies, with special attention to the importance of social justice in promoting a healthy society. Prerequisite: None.

HS 301  Working with Trauma  (3)  

This course provides information on the concept of psychological trauma as well as an overview of the common responses to trauma in individuals and families, PTSD diagnostic criteria, family stress theories, resource management, and resilience. Current treatment practices, both evidence-based and alternative, are reviewed. Principles for working with trauma-exposed populations in family and human services are emphasized. This course is required for the Trauma and Recovery Certificate in Family and Human Services. Prerequisite: None.

HS 302  Social Change & Advocacy/Human Services  (3)  

This course is designed to familiarize students with community organizing, mobilizing, and development. The content of the course will focus on an understanding of social action, change and advocacy in human service practice. Community organizing refers to a particular form of community participation in which “grassroots” people learn techniques to share in power. This implies that the model will focus on recruiting grassroots membership and target systems for change. The methods may include collaborative problem solving, strategic planning and confrontation. Targets for change may be individuals, systems, and families. Prerequisite: None.

HS 304  Case Management  (3)  

This course is designed to enhance students' ability to provide case management services. This course will focus on serving children with severe emotional disturbance and adults with mental illness. In addition, students will investigate issues and responsibilities of case managers, community resources, the family support perspective, client advocacy, the strengths approach when working with people, and the fundamental philosophy and applications of wraparound community services. This course will be helpful for those students with the desire to work as case managers, social workers who would like to expand their knowledge of case management in community settings, bachelor level psychology students wanting to work in community mental health, and administrators/supervisors who have the desire to implement case management services within their agencies. Prerequisite: None.

HS 308  Working with Parents and Youth  (3)  

This course examines effective parenting strategies and parent education programs, with attention to contemporary sociocultural issues impacting families. Students will study evidence-based prevention and intervention practices for working with parents and youth that promote healthy child development, effective family functioning and resilience. Prerequisite: None.

HS 310  Human Sexuality  (3)  

This course will provide students the opportunity to develop basic background knowledge of human sexual anatomy, response, behavior, developmental aspects, problems, and laws. Students will increase vocabulary in the area of human development to describe and identify normal and problematic areas of human sexuality. Prerequisite: None.

HS 312  Substance Abuse and Co-occurring Disorders  (3)  

This course teaches students about effective addictions treatment for persons with co-occurring disorders. The course will provide students with an understanding of terms, services delivery systems, assessment, and strategies for working with clients with co-occurring disorders. The course will cover methods for providing individualized treatment based on a consumer's biological, psychological, social and spiritual needs. The content of this course is based on TAP21 competencies. This is a required course for addictions counseling licensure with the Kansas BSRB. Prerequisite: None.

HS 316  Addictions Treatment  (3)  

This course describes the most generally accepted and scientifically supported models of treatment, recovery, relapse prevention, and continuing care for addiction and other substance-related problems. Students will be exposed to the principles and philosophy of prevention, treatment and recovery. The course will focus on the social, political, economic, cultural, and family context within which addiction and substance abuse exist, including risk and resiliency factors that characterize individuals and groups and their living environments. Emphasis will be given to the behavioral, psychological, physical health and social effects of psychoactive substances on the user and significant others and the importance of research and outcome data and their application in clinical practice. The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addictions counseling licensure with the Kansas BSRB. Enrollment in HS 516 requires department consent.

HS 321  Youth & Violence  (3)  

This course is designed to provide an overview of violence and youth, specifically the problems associated with it; including, but not limited to, such issues as definition, reporting, investigations, causes, treatment, the importance of family preservation and re-integration, institutional abuse, institutional neglect, parent training, parent support, prevention, the roles of foster care, state agencies, the court system, the schools, etc. The role of the human service worker in preventing and dealing with child abuse and youth violence will be an area of special focus. Child abuse will be viewed as a part of a continuum of personal/family violence. Prerequisite: None.

HS 323  Service Coordination  (3)  

This course focuses on the coordination of services for human services clients. Students will learn about intake, screening, assessment, diagnosis, client placement, treatment planning, discharge/transfer plans, report writing, referral and other aspects of service coordination. The course stresses a multidisciplinary approach to service coordination and examines the roles of professionals, agencies, families, community groups, and other support systems in the treatment process across the continuum of care. Students will learn effective, ethical ways to work with clients, with a focus on recovery-oriented systems of care. The content of this class is based in part on TAP21 competencies. This is a required course for addictions counseling licensure with Kansas BSRB.

HS 325  Group Work (Group Counseling)  (3)  

This course is designed to provide both knowledge and skills in the organization and facilitation of psycho-educational and other group experiences used in the helping process, with special focus on addiction and recovery. Students will learn a variety of techniques and strategies designed to facilitate and enhance group learning and the personal growth of participants—particularly psycho-social development. The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addictions counseling licensure with the Kansas BSRB.

HS 330  Theories of Intervention  (3)  

This course focuses on the theories that guide the practice and delivery of Family and Human Services. The course gives the student an understanding of how different theoretical approaches have influenced the development of human service interventions, and includes the study of a variety of helping approaches such as the family systems approach, the feminist approach, and the cognitive-behavioral approach. Students will evaluate the usefulness of the different theoretical approaches in addressing important human problems. In addition, students will be encouraged to explore their own views about human nature and to understand how these views might influence their delivery of human service interventions. Prerequisite: None.

HS 341  Applied Behavioral Interventions  (3)  

This course is designed to familiarize students with the history, theory, and practice of applied behavior analysis. Emphasis will be on the “practice” side, with students learning how to define and observe behaviors, design effective and socially valid interventions to help consumers reach valued goals, and analyze the impact of interventions on important behaviors. Students will learn about best practices in behavior analysis with a variety of consumer populations and will gain experience in reading and evaluating reports of behavior-analytic research. Prerequisite: None.

HS 355  Peacemaking  (3)  

The course will cover the need for peace education in our society. Peace education is pertinent for students majoring in human services with an interest in working with violence and poverty prevention, social justice, the environment, youth, and sustainable communities. Other students will find value in the course through the experiential component of designing a peace education presentation that can be used in their community. Topics include personal peacemaking, nonviolence, conflict resolution, compassionate intentional living, civil rights, equity, education and the environment. Prerequisite: None.

HS 360  Directed Study  (1-3)  

Family and Human Services majors may pursue an independent study project if approved by the instructor in consultation with the Department Chair. A contract must be signed by all parties that specifies learning outcomes, assignment deadlines, and assessment. Independent Study courses must meet equivalencies to Federal definition of a credit hour. Prerequisite: Department consent

HS 362  Human Trafficking and Modern Day Slavery  (3)  

This course is an advanced undergraduate course that focuses on contemporary human trafficking and slavery. Types of trafficking and slavery to be covered include sex trafficking, bonded labor, forced labor, child soldiers, chattel slavery, and domestic servant slavery. The contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, culture, and corruption will be examined. It will review the debates about defining trafficking and the connection between sex trafficking and prostitution. Course materials may include testimonies and autobiographies by survivors, research reports, theoretical essays, policy statements, expert testimonies, podcasts and videos. Prerequisite: None.

HS 370  Mass Victimization/Mental Health  (3)  

This course will provide an overview of interventions used with victims following mass violence and disasters. Additionally, compassion fatigue effects and methods used to assist emergency responders who become victims of disaster through their role in response and recovery will be thoroughly discussed. Attention will focus on mental health effects dealing with both immediate and long-term recovery issues for immediate victims and those responding to the incident. Enrollment in HS 670 requires department consent.

HS 371  Mental Health and Aging  (3)  

This course provides an overview of biological, psychological, and social factors related to successful aging, with an emphasis on the development and maintenance of mental health across the lifespan. The course considers ways that HS professionals can support mental health throughout the aging process. Students will also learn about mental health problems in relation to the aging process. Prerequisite: None.

HS 372  Death & Dying  (3)  

This course will cover biological, psychological, social, and cultural issues surrounding death and the dying process. Topics will include stages of dying, approaches to working with people who are dying and their families, the bereavement process, cross-cultural practices related to death and dying, services available to people who are dying and to their caregivers, and legal and ethical issues surrounding end-of-life decision making.

HS 373  Disaster Response and Recovery  (3)  

This course provides an overview of the hazard cycle and basic concepts of disaster preparedness, response and recovery. Additionally, this course will provide an overview of the helping professional's role during times of disaster including discussion of the specific emergency support functions assigned to groups and agencies as designated in the National Response Framework. Emphasis will also be paid to concepts used when working with direct and indirect victims of disaster.

HS 374  Eastern Therapies in Intervention & Treatment  (3)  

This course highlights Eastern therapies in intervention and treatment across the range of human service populations, including mental health, alcohol and drug abuse, crisis and post-trauma, and crime victimization. The focus will be on an understanding of Western adaptations, transcultural, and holistic approaches to suffering and healing. Special emphasis will be on the Western adaptations of Morita and Naikan therapies. The course is highly interactive and experiential. Prerequisite: None.

HS 375  Hate and Bias Crimes  (3)  

This course provides an overview of hate and bias crimes in the United States. Focus will be on causative factors, human service and criminal justice responses, and impact on victims/survivors and communities. Hate violence based upon race and ethnicity will be a primary focus, but discussion will also include hate violence targeting persons because of gender, sexual orientation, age, religion, and disabilities. Prerequisite: None.

HS 377  Personal & Community Prevention  (3)  

This course explores a principle-based model of professional health and helping. It focuses on a new and innovative approach to prevention and human services that changes lives, communities, and organizations from the inside-out. Most recently known as The 3 Principles (also known as Health Realization), this approach emphasizes people’s innate health and resilience to foster the capacity for personal well-being and the ability to function productively and successfully among colleagues and constituents. This course is directed toward strengthening the student’s approach to life and work, which is necessary for developing the capacity to serve others and respond to the consistent demands of the helping profession. Prerequisite: None.

HS 378  Issues in Aging  (3)  

The course provides an interdisciplinary examination of the human aging process by surveying biological, psychological, sociological, and cultural theories, and influences, on aging. While this course does not focus solely on old age, the course will examine social policies and human services for older people that are informed by our knowledge of the aging process. Prerequisite: None.

HS 381  Internship I  (3)  

This course is the first internship required in the Associate and, Baccalaureate programs, and may be used to meet certificate requirements. The internship consists of a minimum of 150 clock-hours of field experience in an agency in the community under the supervision of agency staff and university faculty. In addition, a weekly seminar is required to integrate learning in the field with classroom instruction. Students work on specific competencies related to the delivery of human services. Additionally, addiction counseling students work on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addiction counseling licensing with the Kansas BSRB. Prerequisite: Department consent.

HS 390  Special Topics  (1-6)  

Topics will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in advance.

HS 395  International Service Experience  (0-3)  

This course will offer the students the opportunity to experience the culture of countries other than the United States while engaged in meaningful service in both urban and rural settings. Through a partnership with a non-governmental agency service assignments will be arranged to meet the needs of various communities. The focus of this assistance is on community and economic development, sustainable agriculture, health, education, training in non-violent resolution of conflicts, and women's empowerment. The purpose of the experience is to develop friendships and a sense of partnership with the members of the community organizations and people the students interact with during their time in country. In addition to completing the service project students will learn about the history, political systems, and the culture of the country they visit. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.

HS 410  Pharmacology & SUDs  (3)  

This course covers fundamental concepts of pharmacology, including physiological, behavioral, psychological, social and health effects of psychoactive substances. The course also covers infectious diseases associated with substance use and methods of disease prevention. Students will learn about drug screening, drug testing and HIV/AIDS testing and counseling, and associated legal and ethical issues. The content of this course is based on TAP21 competencies. This is a required course for addictions counseling licensure with the Kansas Behavioral Sciences Regulatory Board. Prerequisite: None.

HS 411  Family Issues  (3)  

This course will explore the role that family interaction plays in the various areas of Family and Human Services. Different theories of family functioning and intervention will be reviewed, as well as major risk and resiliency factors. Specific attention will be paid to family issues using a strengths-based approach to domestic violence, youth issues, aging family members, illness and disability, and addictions. For students preparing to work as addiction and recovery counselors, knowledge of ways to teach or facilitate discussions of how substance use and abuse affects families and concerned others will be emphasized. The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addictions counseling licensing with the Kansas BSRB. Enrollment in HS 411 requires department consent.

HS 414  Individual Counseling Methods  (3)  

This course will introduce students to a variety of evidence-based counseling theories and approaches for working with individual clients and family/significant others. Students will study common topics that arise in individual counseling as well as cultural and ethical issues associated with effective counseling practice. In addition, the course will examine methods for forming effective helping relationships along with strategies for helping clients establish and work toward realistic, meaningful goals. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate an individual counseling approach covered in this course. The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addiction counseling licensing with the Kansas BSRB.

HS 421  Women and Addiction  (3)  

Women with substance use disorders have serious and unique health concerns. Using a bio-psycho-social-spiritual framework, this course will examine how treatment services are changing to help women successfully navigate the road to recovery. Prerequisite: None.

HS 429  Adolescence & Substance Abuse  (3)  

This course is designed to cover the dynamics of substance abuse for children and youth, and the state-of-the-art of prevention and intervention. Special topics of the course will include growth and development, family process, assessment, intervention, treatment, co-dependency, education, cultural factors, at-risk populations, prevention, and resources. Prerequisite: None.

HS 446  Legal, Ethical, & Professional Issues  (3)  

This course will address legal, ethical, and professional issues which impact the delivery of human services, including codes of ethics, confidentiality, duty to warn, and similar ssues. The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addictions counseling licensing with the Kansas BSRB. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

HS 450  Multicultural Issues  (3)  

This course provides an overview of the major issues in providing family and human services to the increasingly pluralistic population of the United States. Themes to be discussed are: cross-cultural theories of intervention, communication styles, definitions of suffering and recovery, and working with diverse individuals and groups. The range of human service delivery systems, including mental health, alcohol and substance abuse, youth services, gerontology, and victim/survivor services, will be addressed from a multicultural perspective. Emphasis will be on exploring provider attitudes and competencies as well as developing practical applications and solutions. For students preparing to work as addiction and recovery counselors, special emphasis will be given to recognizing the social, political, economic, and cultural context within which addiction and substance abuse exist, including risk and resiliency factors that characterize individuals and groups and their living environments. Enrollment in HS 450 requires department consent.

HS 480  Internship II  (3)  

This course is the second internship required in the Baccalaureate program and may also be used to meet certificate requirements. The internship consists of a minimum of 150 clock-hours of field experience in an agency in the community under the supervision of agency staff and university faculty. In addition, a weekly seminar is required to integrate learning in the field with classroom instruction. Students will work on specific competencies related to the delivery of human services. Additionally, addiction counseling students will work on TAP 21 competencies. This internship requires summative reflection, serving as a culminating experience for Bachelor's degree students. This is a required course for addiction counseling licensing with the Kansas BSRB. Prerequisite: Department consent.

HS 481  Internship in Family & Human Services  (3)  

HS 481 is a supplemental internship course for baccalaureate and certificate students within the Human Services Department who want to obtain additional field experience. The internship consists of a minimum of 150 clock-hours of experience in an agency in the community specific to the student's area of concentration, under the supervision of agency staff and university faculty, as well as a weekly seminar to integrate learning in the field with classroom instruction. Practice will focus on advanced-level skills specific to the student's area of emphasis. Department consent is required for enrollment in this course.

HS 495  Research and Evaluation  (3)  

This course introduces students to applied research and evaluation in family and human services. The purposes and techniques of applied research and evaluation are explored, including qualitative and quantitative approaches. Students gain experience with the critical reading of research articles relating to the evaluation of human service programs. Projects give students direct experience with program evaluation and applied research. The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addictions counseling licensing with the Kansas BSRB. This is a summative course that requires students to synthesize knowledge learned across the curriculum. Prerequisite: Junior/Senior Standing.

HS 498  Senior Capstone Seminar  (3)  

This capstone course is meant to provide students with the opportunity to assimilate and synthesize the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they have acquired through their coursework and field experiences in the major. Through the development of a portfolio, students will demonstrate the acquisition of the major learning objectives necessary to become a skilled human service professional. This course will address additional issues related to professional development and educational advancement. Prerequisite: Majors only.

HS 512  Mental Health & Addictions  (3)  

This course teaches students about effective addictions treatment for persons with co-occurring disorders. The course will provide students with an understanding of terms, service delivery systems, assessment, and strategies for working with clients with co-occurring disorders. The course will cover methods for providing individualized treatment based on a consumer’s biological, psychological, social and spiritual needs. The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addictions counseling licensure with the Kansas BSRB. Enrollment in HS 512 requires department consent.

HS 514  Individual Counseling Methods  (3)  

This course will introduce students to a variety of evidence-based counseling theories and approaches for working with individual clients and family/significant others. Students will study common topics that arise in individual counseling as well as cultural and ethical issues associated with effective counseling practice. In addition, the course will examine methods for forming effective helping relationships along with strategies for helping clients establish and work toward realistic, meaningful goals. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate an individual counseling approach covered in this course. The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addiction counseling licensing with the Kansas BSRB. Prerequisite: Department consent.

HS 516  Addictions Treatment  (3)  

This course describes the most generally accepted and scientifically supported models of treatment, recovery, relapse prevention, and continuing care for addiction and other substance-related problems. Students will be exposed to the principles and philosophy of prevention, treatment and recovery. The course will focus on the social, political, economic, cultural, and family context within which addiction and substance abuse exist, including risk and resiliency factors that characterize individuals and groups and their living environments. Emphasis will be given to the behavioral, psychological, physical health and social effects of psychoactive substances on the user and significant others and the importance of research and outcome data and their application in clinical practice. The course will cover psychoactive substance toxicity, intoxication, and withdrawal symptoms; aggression or danger to others; potential for self-inflicted harm or suicide; and coexisting mental health problems. The content of this class is based on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addictions counseling licensure with the Kansas BSRB. Prerequisite: Department consent.

HS 560  Directed Studies  (1-3)  

In consultation with instructor, the student selects for intensive study a specific area related to family and human services for intensive study. A contract must be signed by all parties that specifies learning outcomes, assignments, deadlines, and assessment strategies. Directed Studies must meet equivalencies to Federal definition of a credit hour. Prerequisites: Graduate Standing and Approval of Course Instructor.

HS 580  Internship: Addiction Counseling  (3)  

This internship is an internship prerequisite course for graduate level majors within the Family and Human Services Department. The internship consists of 200 clock-hours of experience at an addictions treatment agency under the supervision of agency staff and university faculty, as well as a weekly seminar to integrate learning in the field with classroom instruction. Practice will focus on advanced-level skills specific to addiction counseling. The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addiction counseling licensure with the Kansas BSRB. Prerequisite: Department consent.

HS 581  Graduate Internship  (3)  

HS 581 is reserved for those graduate level students who need an internship to complete a certificate or emphasis area. The internship consists of a minimum of 150 clock-hours of experience in an agency or program in the community specific to the student’s area of concentration, under the supervision of agency staff and university faculty, as well as a weekly seminar to integrate learning in the field with classroom instruction. Prerequisite: Department consent.

HS 585  Special Topics  (1-6)  

Topics will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in advance. May be taken more than one semester for variable credit. Prerequisite: Department consent.

HS 595  Research and Evaluation  (3)  

This course introduces students to applied research and evaluation in human services. The purposes and techniques of applied research and evaluation are explored, including qualitative and quantitative approaches. Students gain experience with the critical reading of research articles relating to the evaluation of human service programs. Projects give students direct experience with program evaluation and applied research. The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addictions counseling licensing with the Kansas BSRB. This is a summative course that requires students to synthesize knowledge learned across the curriculum. Prerequisite: Department consent.

HS 600  Integrative Family and Human Services  (3)  

This course uses an integrative lens to survey the profession and practice of family and human services, with an emphasis on addiction counseling. An advanced ecological approach will be used to examine various dimensions of professional practice, including historical and international contexts, family and community involvement, culture-informed practices, integrated treatment, and professional self-care. The content of this course is based on TAP-21 Competencies. Admission to Graduate Program or Department consent.

HS 601  Working with Trauma  (3)  

This course provides information on the concept of psychological trauma as well as an overview of the common responses to trauma in individuals and families , PTSD diagnostic criteria, and resilience. Current treatment pract ices, both evidence-based and alternative, are reviewed. Principles for working with trauma-exposed populations in Human Services/Addiction Counseling are emphasized.

HS 604  Advanced Methods Individual Counseling  (3)  

This course provides the study of counseling theories and practical skills necessary for effective face-to-face and individual counseling. Students will learn a variety of evidenced-based and culturally sensitive techniques designed to facilitate the therapeutic relationship as well as the educational and psycho-social development of clients. Competence in counseling is built on an understanding of, appreciation of, and ability to appropriately use the contributions of various addiction counseling theoretical models as they apply to modalities of care for individuals, groups, families, couples, and significant others. The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addiction counseling licensure at the clinical level with the Kansas BSRB. Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Program or Department consent.

HS 605  Advanced Methods Group Counseling  (3)  

This course is designed to provide knowledge and practical skills in management of psycho-educational and therapeutic groups. Students will be learn a variety of techniques and strategies designed to facilitate educational and psycho-social development of groups of clients and significant others. This course will include information on criteria for cognitive-behavioral strategies and other evidence-based, culturally sensitive approaches to group counseling. Prerequisite: Admission to Graduate Program or Consent of Instructor.

HS 610  Professional Ethics/Practice  (3)  

This course covers major professional readiness issues, including code of ethics, privacy rights and confidentiality, legal responsibilities and liabilities of clinical supervision, and development of a professional attitude and identity. Cultural competence, professional organizations, and licensure and certification are also covered topics. The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addiction counseling licensure at the clinical level with the Kansas BSRB. Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Program or Department consent.

HS 611  Family Issues  (3)  

This course will explore the role that family interaction plays in the various areas of Family and Human Services. Different theories of family functioning and intervention will be reviewed, as well as major risk and resiliency factors. Specific attention will be paid to family issues using a strengths-based approach to domestic violence, youth issues, aging family members, illness and disability, and addictions. For students preparing to work as addiction and recovery counselors, knowledge of ways to teach or facilitate discussions of how substance use and abuse affects families and concerned others will be emphasized. The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. Prerequisite: Department consent.

HS 615  Advanced Pharmacology and Substance Use Disorders  (3)  

This course will address concepts of pharmacological properties and effects of psychoactive substances. The continuum of drug use will be discussed, such as initiation, intoxication, harmful use, abuse, dependence, withdrawal, craving, relapse, and recovery. Behavioral, psychological, social, and physical health effects of psychoactive substances, drug interactions, and medication-assisted therapies will be presented. The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addictions counseling licensing with the Kansas BSRB. Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Program or Department consent.

HS 620  Integrative Approaches to Dual Disorders  (3)  

This course will discuss the collaborative approaches of psychopharmacology, psycho education, supported employment, and culturally sensitive/ integrated/recovery-oriented substance use and mental health treatment. . The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addictions counseling licensing with the Kansas BSRB. Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Program or Consent of Instructor.

HS 621  Women and Addictions  (3)  

Women with substance use disorders have serious and unique health concerns. Using a bio-psycho-social-spiritual framework, this course will examine how treatment services are changing to help women successfully navigate the road to recovery. Prerequisite: Department consent.

HS 623  Addiction Service Coordination  (3)  

This course focuses on the coordination of services for family and human services clients. Students will learn about intake, screening, assessment, diagnosis, client placement, treatment planning, discharge/transfer plans, report writing, referral and other aspects of service coordination. The course stresses a multidisciplinary approach to service coordination and examines the roles of professionals, agencies, families, community groups, and other support systems in the treatment process across the continuum of care. Students will learn effective, ethical ways to work with clients, with a focus on recovery-oriented systems of care. The content of this class is based in part on TAP21 competencies. Prerequisite: Department consent.

HS 625  Addiction/Recovery Services  (3)  

This course will cover the holistic theories and models of treatment which include the philosophies, practices, policies and outcomes of the most generally accepted and evidence-based models of treatment, recovery, relapse prevention, and continuing care for addiction and other substance-related problems. Students will consider the neurobiological, psychological, sociological, and spiritual theories of addiction and recovery, including theories necessary for social change related to addiction and recovery. An emphasis in the course will be given to recovery-oriented systems of care. The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addictions counseling licensing with the Kansas BSRB. Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Program or Department consent.

HS 630  Lifespan Development  (3)  

This course will focus on an integrative approach to wellness from before conception through the end of life. Students will learn about research-supported strategies for supporting biological, psychological, social, and spiritual health and well-being with a focus on meeting needs of the "whole person" throughout the lifespan. Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Program or Department consent.

HS 635  Diagnosis of Substance Use Disorders  (3)  

The course will cover diagnosis of substance use disorders, including the established diagnostic criteria for culturally sensitive screening, assessment, treatment planning, referrals, service coordination, documentation, and consultation. The theories and principles that support the diagnosis and treatment of substance use disorders will be discussed, including indications and contraindications for use of each theory or technique, rationale for intervention, role of the counselor, and importance of incorporating gender and ethnicity in selecting and using assessment and treatment methods. The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addictions counseling licensing with the Kansas BSRB. Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Program or Department consent.

HS 640  Practicum I  (3)  

This course includes a seminar and placement at an approved practicum site, providing the opportunity for applying clinical professional skills under supervision. Course completion will require satisfactory evaluation by the field supervisor, fulfillment of seminar course requirements, and completion of required fieldwork and supervision hours. The skills practiced in this practicum are based on TAP-21 competencies. This is a required course for addiction counseling Ii censure with the Kansas BSRB. Prerequisites: HS 604, HS 605, HS 610, HS 635.

HS 641  Practicum II  (3)  

This course includes a seminar and placement at an approved practicum site, providing the opportunity for further refinement of clinical professional skills under supervision. Course completion will require satisfactory evaluation by the field supervisor, fulfillment of seminar course requirements, and completion of required fieldwork and supervision hours. The skills practiced in this practicum are based on TAP-21 competencies. This is a required course for addiction counseling licensure with the Kansas BSRB. Prerequisites: HS 604, HS 605, HS 610, HS 635; concurrent or prerequisite HS 640.

HS 650  Multicutural Issues  (3)  

This course provides an overview of the major issues in providing family and human services to the increasingly pluralistic population of the United States. Themes to be discussed are: cross-cultural theories of intervention, communication styles, definitions of suffering and recovery, and working with diverse individuals and groups. The range of human service delivery systems, including mental health, alcohol and substance abuse, youth services, gerontology, and victim/survivor services, will be addressed from a multicultural perspective. Emphasis will be on exploring provider attitudes and competencies as well as developing practical applications and solutions. For students preparing to work as addiction and recovery counselors, special emphasis will be given to recognizing the social, political, economic, and cultural context within which addiction and substance abuse exist, including risk and resiliency factors that characterize individuals and groups and their living environments. Prerequisites: Department consent.

HS 655  Peacemaking  (3)  

The course will cover the need for peace education in our society. Peace education is pertinent for students majoring in family and human services with an interest in working with violence and poverty prevention, social justice, the environment, youth, and sustainable communities. Other students will find value in the course through the experiential component of designing a peace education presentation that can be used in their community. Topics include personal peacemaking, nonviolence, conflict resolution, compassionate intentional living, civil rights, equity, education and the environment. Prerequisites: Department consent.

HS 660  Supervision and Leadership  (3)  

This course will provide the knowledge and skills for successful clinical supervision and leadership/administration in family and human services. The content of this course is based on TAP-21 Competencies. Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Program or Department consent.

HS 665  Integrative Residential Experience  (3)  

This course offers students the opportunity to practice integrative approaches in a group setting. This is a 5-day residential that involves intense immersion in creative, expressive, service, and routine activities to enhance the experiential learning of students to incorporate these aspects into addiction counseling and other residential treatment facilities. Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Program or Department consent.

HS 670  Mass Victimization/Mental Health  (3)  

This course will provide an overview of interventions used with victims following mass violence and disasters. Additionally, compassion fatigue effects and methods used to assist emergency responders who become victims of disaster through their role in response and recovery will be thoroughly discussed. Attention will focus on mental health effects dealing with both immediate and long-term recovery issues for immediate victims and those responding to the incident. Prerequisites: Department consent.

HS 673  Disaster Response and Recovery  (3)  

This course will provide an overview of the hazard cycle, and basic concepts of disaster preparedness, response, and recovery. Additionally, this course will provide an overview of the helping professional's role during times of disaster, including the discussion of the specific emergency support functions assigned to groups and agencies as designated in the National Response Framework. Emphasis will also be paid to concepts used when working with direct and indirect victims of disaster. Prerequisites: Department consent.

HS 674  Eastern Therapies in Intervention and Treatment  (3)  

This course highlights Eastern therapies in intervention and treatment across the range of human service populations, including mental health, alcohol and drug abuse, crisis and post-trauma, and crime victimization. The focus will be on an understanding of Western adaptations, transcultural, and holistic approaches to suffering and healing. Special emphasis will be on the Western adaptations of Morita and Naikan therapies. The course is highly interactive and experiential. Prerequisites: Instructor consent.

HS 676  Morita Therapy Intensive  (3)  

This course is intended for those seeking to integrate Morita Therapy into their professional and personal lives. Through experiential/residential learning, students will be able to identify how the concepts of the Morita lifeway are actually practiced in daily living; how the principles are applied to specific life situations; and how immersion in observation, timeliness, and efficiency produces a healthier and more productive helping professional. Prerequisites: Instructor consent.

HS 677  Morita Methods in Counseling  (3)  

This course applies the methods, principles, and theories of Morita Therapy to individual and group counseling in a variety of human service settings, including addiction treatment, victim/survivor assistance, mental health, and grief and dying. Emphasis will be on intervention and counseling approaches for particular client populations. Prerequisites: Instructor consent.

HS 678  Morita Therapy Research Seminar  (3)  

This course offers the unique opportunity to conduct field research on the practice and efficacy of Morita Therapy as it is applied in a variety of outpatient, hospital, and residential treatment settings. The major component of the course may be a study abroad whereby students will participate in small group meetings with, and attend lectures by major Morita educators, researchers, and practitioners. This is a rare opportunity for students to learn first-hand from the leading Moritists. Current study abroad sites include Japan, Canada, Australia, the United Kingdom, and Russia. Prerequisites: Instructor consent.

HS 679  Narrative Practice  (3)  

This course explores the approach of narrative practice as a tool for healing and teaching. Students will become familiar with the basic goals, concepts, and approaches of narrative practice, and the potential contributions of narrative practice to create change. Narrative practice includes using poetry, letter writing, storytelling, journaling, and more, as tools to promote healing, recovery and personal growth. Students will read and discuss the literature relating to narrative practice and will study the implications of the narrative perspective for counseling. They will learn about the application of narrative practice through classroom based experiential exercises and other assignments. Students will learn how narrative practice helps individuals and groups rewrite their stories to transform their lives. Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Program or Consent of Instructor.

HS 685  Special Topic Seminars  (1-6)  

Topics will vary by semester and will be announced in advance. Prerequisites: Admission to Graduate Program or Department consent.

HS 695  Applied Research  (3)  

This course covers the purposes and techniques of applied research, including qualitative and quantitative approaches. Topics to be discussed include research methodology, data collection and analysis, computer research skills, critical evaluation of professional research reports, and practical application of research within cultural and historical context. . The content of this course is based in part on TAP 21 competencies. This is a required course for addictions counseling licensure with the Kansas BSRB. Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Program or Department consent.

HS 777  Continuous Enrollment  (1-3)  

This course is to allow students additional time to complete Capstone, Thesis or Practicum requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.