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Anthropology (AN)

AN 112  Cultural Anthropology  (3)  

Students will learn about contemporary global cultures to develop a culturally relative understanding of and appreciation for diverse societies. Students will explore major domains of culture (such as economics, kinship, social stratification, political organization, communication, and religion) and the impact of globalization and colonialism on culture. Finally, students will explore how anthropological work is applied to contemporary social problems. Prerequisites: None

(General Ed Social Science. Global Citizenship Ethics Div.)  

AN 113  Linguistic Anthropology  (3)  

This course is an introduction to the cross-cultural examination of language and communication. Students will learn how language shapes culture, behavior, and thought, the evolution of language over time, the impact of globalization and colonialism, and the intersectionality of race, ethnicity, class, and gender on language. The class will explore how linguistic anthropologists conduct research and apply research to real world settings.

(General Ed Social Science. Global Citizenship Ethics Div.)  

AN 114  Introduction to Archaeology  (3)  

This course will introduce students to the theories and methods of archaeological science to understand how archaeological remains are used to interpret human prehistory. This course covers what archaeology has revealed about the evolution and experience of humankind from the origins of stone-tool use to the emergence of complex societies around the world. No prerequisites.

(General Ed Social Science. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

AN 116  Biological Anthropology  (3)  

This course focuses on human biology within the framework of biocultural evolution. Students will investigate the biological aspects of human life through the study of principles of evolution, genetics, adaptation, and human variation. Using fossil evidence this course will explore the evolutionary history of human ancestors and nonhuman primates. Prerequisite: None.

(General Ed Social Science. Quan and Sci Reason Lit.)  

AN 118  Introduction to Forensic Science  (3)  

Forensic science is the study and application of science to the processes of law and involves the collection, examination, evaluation, and interpretation of evidence. This course will introduce students to the history, ethics, and limitations of forensics, as well as its application to criminal investigation within specific disciplines such as chemistry, biology, anthropology, computer information sciences, criminal justice, etc. Prerequisite: None.

(General Ed Social Science. Quan and Sci Reason Lit.)  

AN 200  Special Topics in Anthropology  (1-3)  

Topics will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in advance. May be taken more than one semester. Prerequisite: AN 112.

AN 300  Special Topics in Anthropology  (1-3)  

Topics will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in advance. May be taken for more than one semester. Prerequisite: AN 112.

AN 302  Culture and Human Sexuality  (3)  

A theoretical and empirical survey of human sexual beliefs and activities in selected Western and non-western cultures. Prerequisite: AN 112, SO 100, or consent of instructor.

AN 303  Human Origins and Evolution  (3)  

This course examines the evolutionary fossil record of human and nonhuman primates from a bio-cultural perspective. Students will explore current anthropological methods and theories used to interpret the evolutionary data including the development of bipedalism, human adaptations, and the emergence of Homo sapiens. Prerequisite: AN 116.

AN 311  Primate Social Behavior  (3)  

This course focuses on the behavioral ecology and evolution of the Order Primate. Students will examine the taxonomic classification of nonhuman primates and investigate how evolution has shaped the diversity of their social structure and behavior. In addition to watching several anthropological films, we may observe nonhuman primate interactions at a local zoo. Prerequisite: AN 116.

AN 312  Medical Anthropology  (3)  

This course will explore biocultural constructions of health and illness across the globe. Students will critically assess biomedical assumptions and the effects of inequality to gain a better understanding of how different societies view and treat illness, the interaction of biology and culture, and the political and economic roles in relation to patterns of health and healing. Prerequisite: AN 112 or AN 116.

AN 313  Religion, Magic and Witchcraft  (3)  

This course is a cross-cultural study of the forms and functions of non-Western and Western supernatural beliefs. Students will examine a wide range of religious systems and worldviews including myth, ritual, symbolism, magic, ancestor worship, witchcraft, religious healing, and spirit possession. Major theories about the origins and social functions of such beliefs and practices will be explored. Prerequisite: AN 112.

AN 314  The Im/migrant Experience in America  (3)  

This course explores the historical and modern implications of im/migration in the United States; how globalization, colonialism, and transnationalism affect im/migrant communities; and how im/migrants acculturate into their host communities. Special attention will be given to the experiences of im/migrants in Kansas today. Prerequisite: AN 112, AN 113, or consent of instructor.

AN 316  Forensic Anthropology  (3)  

This course introduces students to methods used by forensic anthropologists to recover and positively identify human remains, and to evaluate trauma and taphonomy in medico-legal situations. As an introductory course, forensic anthropology will include an overview of historical and current developments in the field. Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the sequential order for conducting forensic anthropology from the search for forensic scenes through the recovery of the remains in the field, data collection in the morgue, analysis in the laboratory, to the reconstruction of events surrounding the crime scene, and preparation of the final report. Prerequisites: AN 114, AN 116, or AN 118.

AN 317  Peoples and Cultures of Africa  (3)  

This course explores sub-Saharan African societies through selected case studies covering topics such as kinship, gender, religion, political economy, geography, and contemporary social issues. Analysis includes the pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial histories of the various groups. Prerequisite: AN 112.

AN 318  North American Archaeology  (3)  

As a survey of the diverse prehistoric cultures and environments of North America, this course will examine economic, technological, and organizational changes from the earliest hunter-gatherers to pre-Colombian complex societies. Students will gain an understanding of the history and theory of North American archaeology and explore experimental archaeological techniques through ancient tool making. Prerequisite: AN 114 or consent of instructor.

AN 319  Peoples and Cultures of Indigenous North America  (3)  

This course explores indigenous North American cultures through selected case studies covering topics such as kinship, gender, religion, political economy, geography, and contemporary social issues. Analysis includes the pre-colonial, colonial, and post-colonial experiences of the various groups. Prerequisite: AN 112.

AN 320  Ancient Latin America  (3)  

This course is an archaeological survey of the Pre-Columbian heritage of Mesoamerica and South America. Cultures such as the Olmec, Maya, Aztec, Moche, Nazca, Chimu, and Inca will be examined through artifacts, art, architectural remains, and ethnohistoric documents. Students will achieve an understanding of the growth and decline of complex societies, and will examine the relationship between the past and contemporary Latin American cultures. Prerequisite: AN 114 or consent of instructor.

AN 321  Anthropology of Women  (3)  

The roles and statuses of women around the world are examined in the three sub-systems of culture – material, social and ideational – including in-depth studies of women in horticultural, peasant, and modern societies. Prerequisite: AN 112 or consent of instructor.

AN 322  Visual Anthropology  (3)  

This course explores how images and other types of media are created, circulated, and consumed by members of diverse cultures and by anthropologists. Topics to be covered include how culture is portrayed in media and in museums, the use of media as a tool in ethnographic research; analysis of media from an anthropological perspective; and the creation of the “other” through media. Prerequisite: AN 112.

AN 324  History and Theory of Anthropology  (3)  

This course examines the history of Anthropology while also exploring current debates, schools of thought, and contemporary theories from a four-field perspective. Prerequisites: Declared major, AN 112, and junior standing.

AN 327  Human Osteology  (3)  

In this hands-on laboratory course, students will examine the dynamic, living system of the human skeleton. The focus of this class will be on the identification of complete and fragmentary human skeletal and dental remains. The course will explore growth and development of osseous and dental structures, human variation in skeletal biology, and the modification of tissues through traumatic, pathologic, taphonomic, and cultural factors. Prerequisite: AN 316.

AN 335  Applied Anthropology  (3)  

This course examines how anthropology can be applied to real-world problems. Students will explore: 1) various career paths including working with nonprofit and community-based organizations, businesses and corporations, and government, 2) key aspects of applied anthropological practice such as ethics, policy analysis, and working in teams, and 3) practice the collection and analysis of data through participation in a real field project culminating in a technical report. Prerequisite: AN 112 or AN 113 and junior/senior status.

AN 336  Globalization  (3)  

An examination of work, life, and culture in an increasingly globalized world. Prerequisite: AN 112 or consent of instructor.

AN 358  Lab Methods in Forensic Anthropology  (3)  

In this course, students will be introduced to forensic anthropological laboratory methods through multiple hands-on projects using real skeletal material and forensic cases. This course will introduce students to many of the important principles, methods, and techniques that forensic anthropologists use to macerate, identify, analyze, and curate human remains. Prerequisite: AN 327.

AN 362  Methods of Social Research  (3)  

Specific research techniques employed by sociologists, anthropologists, and other social scientists are considered, including polls and surveys, the interview and participant observation. Each student will complete an outside project. One of two capstone courses required of Anthropology majors. Prerequisites: Declared major and 15 hours of Anthropology; or consent of instructor.

AN 363  Internship  (1-3)  

Field training to provide students with experience in an operational or research setting through assignment to local social agencies or museums approved and supervised by a faculty member. May be elected twice for a maximum of three hours. Prerequisites: Declared major, senior standing, and consent of instructor.

AN 366  Directed Readings  (1-3)  

Under supervision of a faculty member, students will undertake an extensive readings course to further their understanding of a specific topic within Anthropology. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours. Students are limited to six hours total from AN 366 and AN 367 combined. Prerequisite: Declared major, junior/senior standing, and consent of instructor.

AN 367  Directed Research  (1-3)  

Upon supervision of a faculty member, students will undertake an independent research project in a specific aspect of Anthropology. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours. Students are limited to six hours total from AN 366 and AN 367 combined. Prerequisite: Declared major, junior/senior standing, and consent of instructor.

AN 369  Kansas Archaeology  (3)  

This course is a survey of the archaeological record of Kansas from the earliest Paleoindian inhabitants through the Historic period. Students may have the opportunity to visit archaeological sites and museums in Kansas and participate in archaeological analysis through hands-on work with collections. Prerequisite: AN 114 or consent of instructor.

AN 370  Historical Archaeology  (3)  

In this course, students will examine the recent past through material remains of societies that also have some form of written evidence. Students will also learn about historic preservation, museum curation methods, and historic interpretation for public archaeology. Prerequisite: AN 114 or consent of instructor.

AN 371  Field and Lab Methods in Archaeology  (3)  

In this course, students will learn how to properly survey and excavate an archaeological site and how to identify and analyze artifacts, cultural features, and sediments using state-of-the-art techniques. Students will gain hands-on experience working in a mock-excavation setting and with real archaeological collections. This course is a prerequisite for AN 372 Archaeological Field School. Prerequisite: AN 114 or consent of instructor.

AN 372  Archaeological Field School  (1-6)  

This course provides students with practical, hands-on experience where they apply their archaeological training and knowledge at a field site held off-campus. The field school may include survey, location, and excavation techniques, technical mapping, and proper documentation and collection of field data. Long-distance and overnight travel may be required. Prerequisite: AN 371 or consent of instructor.

AN 374  Field Methods in Forensic Anthropology  (3)  

As part of a forensic science team, forensic anthropologists apply their knowledge and training specifically to the recovery and excavation of skeletonized remains, badly decomposing human remains, or taphonomically altered remains. Students will gain hands-on experience using the latest methods to search, locate, document, and recover human remains and evidence from outdoor scenes in a timely fashion using the principles of forensic archaeology and forensic anthropology. Prerequisites: AN 316.

AN 375  Forensic Anthropology Field School  (3)  

The Forensic Anthropology Field School provides students with practical, hands-on experience through a series of mock forensic cases including surface scatters, burials, and/or fatal fires. Students will be applying the techniques and methodologies they learn in AN 374 to simulated forensic cases beginning with the initial search to the recovery and transport of remains to the laboratory. Over the semester, students will be introduced to forensic archaeological recoveries and the proper evidence documentation and collection methods. Prerequisites: AN 374.

AN 397  Special Topics: Archaeology  (1-3)  

Topics will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in advance. May be taken more than one semester. Prerequisite: AN 114.

AN 398  Special Topics: Forensic Anthropology  (1-3)  

Topics will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in advance. May be taken more than one semester. Prerequisite: AN 316.

AN 400  Special Topics in Anthropology  (1-3)  

Topics will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in advance. May be taken for more than one semester. Prerequisite: AN 112 or consent of instructor.

AN 428  Case Studies Forensic Anthropology  (3)  

This hands-on course will be the culmination and combination of the other Forensic Anthropology concentration core requirement courses. Utilizing real forensic case studies, this class will highlight the anthropological techniques and methods used to recover and identify skeletal and decomposing human remains. Students will work on cases from initial recovery to the preparation of the final forensic anthropological case report. At the same time, the case studies will underscore the importance of anthropologists in forensic science and will debunk myths portrayed in popular media. Prerequisite: AN 327.

AN 600  Special Topics in Anthropology  (1-3)  

Topics will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in advance. May be taken for more than one semester. Prerequisite: Admission to the MLS program and consent of instructor.

AN 621  Anthropology of Women  (3)  

The roles and statuses of women around the world are examined in the 3 sub-systems of culture-material, social and ideational--including in depth studies of women in horticulture, peasant, and modern societies. Prerequisites: AN 112 and admission to the MLS program or consent of instructor.

AN 624  History and Theory of Anthropology  (3)  

This course examines the history of Anthropology while also exploring current debates, schools of thought, and contemporary theories from a four-field perspective. Prerequisite: AN 112, admission to a graduate program; or consent of instructor.