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Biology (BI)

BI 100  Introduction to Biology  (3)  

An introduction to the major principles and theories of Biology: genes, evolution, cell biology, and the structure and function of the major kingdoms of life. Two sections of special academic interest include Health Emphasis and General Education Emphasis both of which qualify as General Education Courses. Not applicable toward credit for biology major requirements. Two or three lectures a week. Prerequisite: None.

(General Ed Natural Science. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

BI 101  Introductory Biology Laboratory  (2)  

Introductory laboratory with activities that examine the structure and function of organisms. Supplementary to BI 100. Not applicable toward credit for biology major requirements. One three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: BI 100 with a grade of C or better, or concurrent enrollment. Concurrently enrolled students may not drop BI 100 and remain enrolled in BI 101.

(General Ed Natural Science. Quan and Sci Reason Lit.)  

BI 102  General Cellular Biology  (5)  

The organization and activities of organisms at the cellular level. Analysis of the chemical, genetic, and microscopic properties shared by all cells. This is the beginning biology course for the student who wishes to major in biology. Four lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: None.

(General Ed Natural Science. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

BI 103  General Organismal Biology  (5)  

An introduction to the basic principles of organismal biology with an emphasis on plants and animals. Topics covered will include general ecology and evolution, anatomy and physiology, and organismal diversity. Four lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: BI 102 with a grade of C or better.

BI 110  General Zoology  (4)  

The organ systems, taxonomy, and evolution of animals. Biological principles as found in the animal kingdom. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: BI 102.

BI 140  Introduction to Forensic Biology  (3)  

An introduction to the collection, processing and testing of biological evidence during forensic investigations. Topics include: the use of biological samples in crime scene investigation, molecular biology techniques used to detect biological samples and evaluating the strength of DNA profiling. Prerequisites: None.

(General Ed Natural Science. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

BI 150  Evolution  (3)  

Designed for non-science majors who want a basic explanation of evolution, how it works and its impact on scientific thinking and society. The course will include discussion of simple genetics, origins of life, geologic eras and scientific creationism. Prerequisite: None.

(General Ed Natural Science. Quan and Sci Reason Lit.)  

BI 155  Sexually Transmitted Disease  (1)  

An overview of diseases, which rely on sexual interactions for transmission, e.g., AIDS, syphilis, herpes, and others. The history, epidemiology, clinical nature, treatment and prevention of these diseases are discussed. Prerequisite: None.

BI 180  Special Topics/Biology  (1-3)  

Selected topics of general interest. Not applicable toward credit for biology major requirements. Prerequisite: None.

BI 202  Biology of Behavior  (3)  

Biological aspects of human & animal behavior, including sociobiology, ethology, behavioral genetics & evolution, heredity vs. environment, male-female differences, & the neurological & hormonal basis of behavior. Prerequisites: None.

(General Ed Natural Science. Quan and Sci Reason Lit.)  

BI 203  Human Impact on the Environment  (3)  

The structure and function of a natural environment and the impact of humans on that environment. Topics include population and food, various pollution problems, energy problems, and possible solutions. Not applicable toward credit for biology major requirements. Prerequisite: None.

(General Ed Natural Science. Global Citizenship Ethics Div.)  

BI 206  Introductory Microbiology  (4)  

The basic characteristics of microbes and an analysis of their effects on humans. Emphasis on human medical microbiology. Basic microbiological techniques, with an emphasis on those used in medicine. Developed primarily for students majoring in nursing. Not applicable toward credit for biology major requirements. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BI 100 (Health Emphasis preferred) and BI 101 or BI 102.

BI 230  Introduction to Human Physiology  (3)  

This human physiology course is designed for those needing a basic background in physiology principles without the additional functional knowledge that is obtained in the laboratory setting. The emphasis of this course will include learning basic relationships and necessary language to be able to understand the terminology that may be used in fields that are in the periphery of physiology. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in BI 100 (Health Emphasis preferred).

BI 234  Introduction to Biotechnology  (3)  

The purpose of this course is to introduce and explore the scientific basis of a broad range of topics in the emerging areas of biotechnology involving microbes, plants, and animals, and to understand the impact of biotechnology on society. Additional topics include: history, development, current operations, future advances, industry structure, and career opportunities within the biotechnology industry. Pre-requisite: BI 102 with a grade of C or better.

BI 250  Introduction to Human Anatomy  (3)  

The structure of the human body, with emphasis on skeletal and muscular systems. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in BI 100 or BI 102.

BI 255  Human Physiology  (4)  

The basic functions of human organ systems. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BI 100 (Health Emphasis preferred) and BI 101 or BI 102.

BI 260  Biology of Aging  (3)  

Mechanisms of aging processes with special reference to human gerontology. Unfavorable progressive changes in molecules, cells, systems, and organisms will be examined. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in BI 100 (Health Emphasis preferred).

BI 275  Human Anatomy  (4)  

Designed primarily for students majoring in biology, nursing or physical therapy. Lectures survey the organ systems with emphasis on skeletal, muscular, nervous, circulatory and reproductive systems. Laboratory exercises include both animal and human cadaver dissection. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites: A grade of “C” or better in BI 100 (Health Emphasis preferred) and BI 101 or BI 102. NOTE: Pregnant women should consult with physician and instructor prior to enrollment due to specimen preservatives used in this course.

BI 280  Special Topics/Biology  (1-3)  

Selected topics of general interest. Prerequisite: One or more general biology course(s).

BI 300  Field Biology  (3)  

Identification and study of plants and animals in the field, including their ecology. Prerequisite: BI 103 with a grade of C or better.

BI 301  General Microbiology  (4)  

Characteristics of microorganisms with major emphasis on bacteria and viruses. Principle roles of microorganisms in our environment. Laboratory introduces basic techniques used in microbiological studies. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisites: BI 103 with a grade of C or better, and CH 151.

BI 302  Entomology  (4)  

Designed to cover the general aspects of the anatomy, physiology, taxonomy, and behavior of insects. Field trips will be an integral part of this course. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: BI 103 with a grade of C or better.

BI 303  Invertebrate Zoology  (4)  

The invertebrate groups with emphasis on basic zoological principles. Field trips are an integral part of this course. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: BI 103 with a grade of C or better.

BI 305  Parasitology  (4)  

Protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasites of humans. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: BI 103 with a grade of C or better.

BI 310  Ecology  (4)  

Examines the interactions between organisms, their environment, and their evolution; major topics include global ecology, physical ecology, community ecology, species interactions, and biodiversity. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: BI 103 with a grade of C or better.

BI 314  Statistics for Biologists  (3)  

A course designed as an overview of statistical procedures common in biological research emphasizing their biological relevance and interpretation. Lectures will cover data presentation, parameter estimation, hypothesis testing, goodness of fit, analysis of variance, regression, and a brief introduction to modern methods of analysis. Labs will cover the practical implementation of statistical analyses using the statistical package R. Prerequisite: BI 102 and MA 116 with grades of C or better. Recommended: MA 140 with a grade of C or better

BI 315  Vertebrate Zoology  (4)  

A taxonomic approach to the study of vertebrate animals. Phylogeny, ecology and behavior will be discussed, as will general structure and function relating to phylogeny. The laboratory will include several field trips. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: BI 103 with a grade of C or better.

BI 319  Biology for STEM Educators  (3)  

An exploration of the core concepts and principles that unite the major disciplines of the Biological Sciences. The impacts that each of these concepts have on society will be discussed. Special emphasis will be placed on developing lesson and models that effectively communicate complex ideas to a range of ages and audiences. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in either BI 100 and BI 101 or BI 102, and Junior standing.

BI 322  Advanced General Botany  (4)  

A survey of the anatomy, physiology, and diversity of plants. Evolutionary development, ecology, and applied botany will be discussed. The laboratory will include both field-based and laboratory-based experiments. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or better in BI 103

BI 324  Systematic Botany  (3)  

Exploration of the flowering plants of Kansas and their habitats. Major principles of systematics are covered. Two three-hour class periods per week, and nearly all periods are devoted to field trips to local areas of interest. Prerequisite: BI 103 with a grade of C or better.

BI 325  Microbiology of Human Disease  (5)  

Basic principles involved in pathogenesis of human disease, host resistance, and epidemiology. Characteristics and laboratory diagnosis of major bacterial pathogens. Three lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite: BI 301.

BI 328  Plant Anatomy and Physiology  (3)  

Examines the anatomy and physiology of the stems, roots, leaves and reproductive organs of plants, from the molecular to the organismal levels. Prerequisite: BI 103 with a grade of C or better.

BI 330  Animal Physiology  (4)  

A comparative study of the basic physiological processes occurring throughout the animal kingdom. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period a week. Prerequisites: BI 103 with a grade of C or better, and CH 152.

BI 333  General Genetics  (4)  

A course designed to cover basic genetic principles, including Mendelian Genetics, cytogenetics, population genetics and an introduction to molecular genetics. Laboratory experiments will be used to illustrate the genetic principles covered in lecture. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: BI 103 with a grade of C or better, and CH 151.

BI 340  Evolutionary Biology  (3)  

The basic ideas of evolutionary biology will include classical Darwinian evolution, and modern analyses of evolutionary theory. Specific topics covered are natural selection, sources of variation, origin of life, paleobiology, speciation, sociobiology and human evolution. Course will also include the historical development of evolutionary ideas as well as a discussion of the impact of evolution on societal issues. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite: BI 103 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

BI 343  Human Genetics  (3)  

Classical and molecular mechanisms of inheritance in individuals, families, and populations. Topics include genetics of behavior, outcomes of gene and chromosomal mutations, cancer genetics, genetic counseling, personalized genomics, and issues and applications of current gene and reproductive technologies. Prerequisites: BI 333 with a grade of C or better, or consent of instructor.

BI 353  Molecular Genetics  (3)  

The molecular basis of genetic systems including chromosomal and extrachromosomal elements. Topics include manipulation of DNA, molecular techniques, cloning, methods for the study of gene expression, mutability of DNA, plasmid systems, prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, and practical aspects of biotechnology. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite: BI 301 or BI 333.

BI 354  Molecular Biology Laboratory  (3)  

A laboratory course designed to introduce the student to modern molecular biology techniques, including recombinant DNA technology (gene cloning), DNA sequence analysis, PCR, Southern hybridization, bioinformatics, and more. This course is designed to mimic a real-world research experience. Two periods totaling 5 hours per week to include one hour for lecture/discussion. Prerequisite: BI 301 or BI 333 or BI 353 or consent of instructor.

BI 355  Developmental Biology  (5)  

Topics in modern developmental biology will be covered in lecture and through readings so as to gain a working knowledge of the analyses of developmental processes such as fertilization, embryonic cleavage, cell determination and cell differentiation in selected species. Emphasis will be on experiments that reveal how these processes are controlled at the molecular and cellular levels. Three lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite: BI 333 with a grade of C or better.

BI 357  Histology  (4)  

Fundamental tissues and microscopic examination of vertebrate organs. Two lectures and two two-hour laboratory periods a week. Prerequisite: BI 103 with a grade of C or better.

BI 360  Human Cadaver Dissection  (3)  

This course is intended to give students who aspire to go to medical school, dental school or post graduate human anatomy programs a chance to gain experience dissecting and learning human cadaveric anatomy. This is a five week summer course that covers the dissection of the entire human cadaver. Focus of dissection is primarily on muscle and joint anatomy, but includes thoracic and abdominopelvic organs along with vascular dissection and identification. Student evaluation is based on participation and dissection skills. Prerequisites: BI 103 with a grade of C or better, or BI 275, and instructor consent.

BI 362  Immunology  (3)  

Molecular and cell biology of specific and nonspecific immune responses in mammals, with special emphasis on human immune systems. Reviews experimental support for current immunological theories. Roles of immunology in human health and disease. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite: BI 301 and BI 333 or BI 353 or CH 350.

BI 363  Immunology Laboratory  (2)  

Laboratory course designed to introduce students to current clinical & research procedures in immunology. Includes techniques utilized in biological & biochemical research as well as medical applications. Prerequisite: BI 362 with a grade of C or better, or concurrent enrollment.

BI 370  Virology  (3)  

The structure and properties of animal viruses. Molecular aspects of virus replication and the role of viruses in disease states. Three lectures a week. Prerequisite: BI 301.

BI 380  Special Topics/Biology  (1-3)  

A consideration of various emerging or advanced specialty areas in biology, offered according to student and staff availability. Prerequisites: BI 103 with a grade of C or better, and consent of instructor (Additional prerequisites might be needed depending upon particular topic).

BI 389  Biology Literature Review  (2)  

Students will learn to critically read and analyze primary biology literature in at least four of the five core biology disciplines: cell biology, botany, zoology, microbiology and genetics. It is designed for students who have not yet taken Biology Seminar (BI 390). Students will orally present the data from these papers to the class and complete a series of worksheets on the content of the literature. Students will also learn the basics of a thorough, scientific literature search online and the mechanics of writing a scientific abstract. Two lectures a week. Prerequisite: BI 103 with a grade of C or better, and one other biology core course, plus consent of instructor.

BI 390  Biology Seminar  (1)  

Organization and oral presentations of the results of current research in the biological sciences. Utilization of recent journal literature, abstracting techniques, and oral communication of scientific data will be emphasized. One semester is required of all majors. Up to three credit hours may be applied toward meeting departmental or university graduation requirements. Prerequisites: 15 hours of BI and Jr. standing.

BI 395  Research in Biology  (1-3)  

This course is the capstone course in the Biology degree, and open only to declared majors at Washburn University. Independent, undergraduate research on some special problem in biology, the field to be chosen by the student in conference with the instructor. Open only to students, from any discipline, with at least fifteen hours of credit derived from core majors’ courses in Biology. At least one semester is required of every Biology major. A maximum of six credit hours of research may be taken by any student, and no more than 3 credits in one semester. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

BI 420  Forensic Molecular Biology  (4)  

This course will thoroughly cover the theory behind the molecular biology used in forensic DNA analysis as well as the practical considerations pertaining to the forensic lab environment. Through simulated examples of real-life sample types, students will learn and gain experience with techniques and equipment currently used in the forensic biology field. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in BI 333, CH 340, and CH 342 or consent of instructor.

BI 440  Biotechnology Internship  (3)  

Experience and training in an approved biotechnology or related industry laboratory, or academic research laboratory. Prerequisites: 27 credit hours of biology, 15 credit hours of chemistry, and Instructor approval.

BI 448  Zoo Internship  (3)  

Field experience and training at an AZA accredited Zoo. Students can specialize in either an education, animal, or horticulture tract. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in BI 102 and BI 103, Junior Standing, and/or consent of instructor.