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Criminal Justice (CJ)

CJ 100  Crime & Justice in America  (3)  

This is an introductory course in the field of criminal justice. It introduces the student to the nature and extent of crime in America and provides a detailed description of the components of the American criminal justice system: police, courts and corrections. In the second portion of the course, the role of the crime victim and the principal functions of criminal justice agencies are considered.

CJ 110  Introduction to Law Enforcement  (3)  

This course examines the history and major functions of modern law enforcement agencies and personnel. Special attention to career opportunities and alternatives in the field of law enforcement.

CJ 115  Introduction to Forensic Investigations  (3)  

This course introduces students to forensic science and is a primer to more advanced courses in the field of forensic science. The history of forensic science is explored, with particular emphasis on forensic investigations, as well as the developing and changing nature of the field. The role that forensic science plays within the American Criminal Justice System is a focus of study. The various technologies used are reviewed as are the limitations of forensic science. Prerequisite: None.

CJ 120  Introduction to Corrections  (3)  

Contemporary correctional activities and the functions performed by correctional agencies and personnel. Includes an overview of the functions performed by correctional institutions and agencies for juveniles and adults.

CJ 130  Public & Private Security  (3)  

History and philosophy of security, goals and measures of businesses, security firms, military services, and governmental agencies.

CJ 210  Criminal Law  (3)  

Review of substantive criminal law theory and specific elements common to index offenses will be presented. Course will offer a brief synopsis of the historical development of penal codes, as well as application of the Model Penal Code. Special emphasis will include a review of established defenses to criminal liability such as the insanity, self-defense and diminished mental capacity defenses.

CJ 220  Criminal Justice Communications  (3)  

Methods of gathering and reporting information essential to effective criminal justice operations are reviewed, discussed, and practiced. Emphasis is on developing effective interviewing skills and accurate reporting of information gathered by criminal justice practitioners.

CJ 225  Jail Workshop  (3)  

This course provides the student an overview of the history, functions, design and operation of the American jail.

CJ 230  Principles of Investigation  (3)  

Gathering information; principles and procedures used for crime scene protection and search; collection and preservation of evidence; interviewing and interrogation of complainants, witnesses, suspects, and victims; and scientific applications to a variety of investigations conducted in criminal justice setting.

CJ 235  Traffic Law & Investigation  (3)  

Provides a basic introduction to the traffic regulation function in modern society with particular emphasis on the impact on technology, judicial decisions, Federal mandates and societal expectations on the enforcement of traffic laws and the investigation of related violations.

CJ 245  Officer Survival  (3)  

Comprehensive police officer survival seminar designed for basic and in-service police training. Includes examination of the laws regarding use of force, civil and criminal liability, mental conditioning, post shooting trauma, the dynamics of lethal force and other special topics, including biomedical hazards, dealing with gangs and plainclothes and off-duty officer survival. Strenuous physical activity expected. Advise instructors of any medical condition that would prevent involvement in the training.

CJ 250  Patrol Procedures  (3)  

Provides a comprehensive study of police patrol procedures, beginning with a historical overview of local policing and moves into current patrol practices. Includes presentations of old training films, as available, to allow students to critique early methods with techniques learned. Includes legal issues and their impact on police methods.

CJ 260  Independent Study  (1-3)  

Criminal Justice majors may pursue an independent research project approved by faculty in consultation with the Department Chair. Independent Study may not be used in place of any courses required of the criminal justice major. Independent Study courses must meet equivalencies to Federal definition of a credit hour. Prerequisites: 6 hours of CJ course work.

CJ 290  Special Topics  (1-3)  

Topics will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in advance. May be taken for more than one semester for variable credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

CJ 303  Diversity in American Culture  (3)  

This course is designed to explore the relationship between culture and the criminal justice system. Emphasis is given to understanding the historical, theoretical, and structural perspectives of racial/ethnic and minority groups in society.

CJ 305  Crime & Justice in Film  (3)  

The course is intended to survey modern America’s attitudes about our criminal justice system through analysis of several motion pictures dealing with various facets of the system.

CJ 310  Police Problems & Practices  (3)  

Analysis of police functions and problems commonly encountered in the performance of those functions. Problem-solving methods and techniques are reviewed, discussed, and practiced. Prerequisite: CJ 110 or consent of instructor.

CJ 315  Drug Abuse & Criminality  (3)  

Societal reaction to drug abuse in terms of legal sanctions, treatment alternatives, and the criminal justice response (law enforcement, the courts, corrections). How substance abuse and criminal behavior are interrelated.

CJ 318  Juvenile Justice  (3)  

This course provides an overview of the American Juvemnile Justice System, including theories and measurements of juvenile offending; the roles and relationships of law enforcement, courts, probation and parole, diversion programs, service agencies, and correctional institutions. Prerequisites: CJ 100.

CJ 320  Correctional Treatment Strategies  (3)  

Treatment strategies employed in adult and juvenile corrections programs, focusing on classification, types of institutional programming, as well as community and aftercare facilities. Prerequisite: CJ 120 or consent of instructor.

CJ 323  Serial Killers  (3)  

This course will review the methods used by criminal justice agencies to identify and track serial killers, examine various aspects of this particular criminal profile and review the impact of such criminal activity on our society. Case studies of convicted serial killers will be used to demonstrate the various factors that influence the development of this abnormal criminal mind. Prerequisite: None.

CJ 324  Evidenced Based Corrections  (3)  

This course is designed to explore best practices in corrections that are based on research. Emphasis is given to studying the findings from program evaluations to better understand EBP that have reduced recidivisim and enhanced public safety. Prerequisites: CJ 120.

CJ 325  Applied Criminology  (3)  

Applied criminology will examine various criminological theories including delinquent subculture, differential association, and conflict theories, and their application by criminal justice professionals. In addition, the student will understand and practice the application of criminological theory in dealing with an individual offender.

CJ 330  Judicial Process  (3)  

Historical development and contemporary structure of state and federal trial courts and courts of appellate review will be presented. Constitutional and statutory authority for courts, court procedure, and defendant rights in the judicial process will be reviewed to include due process, public and speedy trial, jury composition, self-incrimination, punishment and state and federal post-conviction relief and/or appellate review. Other statutory and administrative/regulatory laws will be reviewed pertaining to the Code of Professional Responsibility as it applies to respective judicial officers. Close analysis is offered of the respective roles, duties performed, and career paths for judicial officers such as judges, prosecutors and defense counsel.

CJ 332  Law of Corrections  (3)  

This course is designed to explore the law of corrections by providing an in-depth examination of the court system with particular focus on prisoners' post-conviction rights,. Topics covered include the various sources of correctional law, prisoners' statutory and constitutional rights, potential liabi;lity for corrections employees, and other controversial legal issues in corrections. Prerequisites: CJ 120.

CJ 337  Sex Offenders  (3)  

This course concerns sex offenders, sexual offending behavior and the policy responses of this type of crime. The course will cover “typical” sex offender characteristics, at least as much as the behavior can be typified. It will investigate the nature and procedure of sexual offending behavior. Policy targeted toward preventing or curbing behavior will also be explored. Prerequisite: None.

CJ 340  Crime Prevention  (3)  

Situational crime prevention, environmental design, physical security measures, defensible space, opportunity theories, crime displacement, rational choice theory, and crime prevention studies. Prerequisite: CJ 130 or consent of instructor.

CJ 342  Capital Punishment in America: The Death Penalty  (3)  

An overview of capital punishment in America with specific application to Kansas. The course covers different philosophical and religious positions on the death penalty; pro and con arguments related to retribution, deterrence, and incapacitation; the relative costs of the death penalty vs. permanent incarceration; innocent people on death row, discrimination, and arbitrariness in the application of the death penalty; and the role of judges, prosecutors, defense attorneys, juries, and witnesses in death penalty cases. Prerequisite: CJ 100 or consent of instructor.

CJ 345  Homicide  (3)  

An in-depth examination of homicide investigation and the tools required to bring the case to a successful completion. Prerequisite: CJ 110 or CJ 115, or consent of instructor.

CJ 350  Legal Issues in Security and Safety  (3)  

Civil and criminal liability of security officers and employers, security laws of arrest/search/seizure, security regulations, security licensing and training, OSHA standards and legal requirements, and case studies. Prerequisite: CJ 130 or consent of instructor.

CJ 352  Firearms Decision Making  (3)  

Firearms decision making provides students with the opportunity to examine the legal aspects of police use of force incidents. During the course students will learn about firearms and the proper safety, usage and storage of weapons. Each student will be provided the opportunity to use the Firearms Training System (FATS) and the simmunitions weapons system and experience split second decision making in a use of force incident. Finally, student will study the basic preparation for dealing with critical incidents and the aftermath of a shooting incident. An additional fee is associated with this course. Prerequisite: CJ 100 or consent of instructor.

CJ 355  Women in Criminal Justice  (3)  

An overview of the theories and facts on female criminality, employment practices and on-the-job problems that affect female criminal justice workers, and factors relative to female victims of crime.

CJ 360  Independent Study  (1-3)  

Criminal Justice majors may pursue an independent research project approved by faculty in consultation with the Department Chair. Independent Study may not be used in place of any courses required of the criminal justice major. Independent Study courses must meet equivalencies to Federal definition of a credit hour. Prerequisites: 6 hours of CJ course work or consent.

CJ 362  Human Trafficking  (3)  

An advanced undergraduate course that focuses on contemporary human trafficking and slavery. Types of trafficking and slavery to be covered include sex trafficking, bonded labor, forced labor, child soldiers, chattel slavery, and domestic servant slavery. The contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, culture, and corruption will be examined. Debates about defining trafficking and the connection between sex trafficking and prostitution will be reviewed. Course materials may include testimonies and autobiographies by survivors, research reports, theoretical essays, policy statements, expert testimonies, podcasts and videos. Prerequisite: Junior Standing or permission of the course instructor.

CJ 364  Homeland Security  (3)  

This course will provide an introduction and general overview of homeland security in the United States. The course will focus on helping students understand the key elements of homeland security strategies and operational policies. The role and purpose of homeland security strategy will be evaluated in regard to its implementation in a contemporary democratic society. Prerequisite: None.

CJ 365  Police & the Community  (3)  

Relevant literature and the scope of the problem, psychological and sociological considerations; and viable programs that effectively improve communications between the police and the public. Prerequisite: CJ 110 or consent of instructor.

CJ 367  Firearms and Tool Mark Examination  (3)  

This course will provide an understanding of the history and scope of firearms and toolmark examination as well as introducing students to basic methods of firearms and tool mark identification and examination. An emphasis will be placed on the use of this type of evidence as a means of facilitating effective crime scene investigations. The theory of firearms and tool mark evidence identification will be discussed as students are able to develop a better understanding of the scientific method and how it is applied to criminal investigations. Prerequisite: CJ 115 or consent of instructor.

CJ 368  Introduction to Bloodstain Pattern Analysis  (3)  

This is the first of two courses in Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (BPA). Each course will cover different aspects of BPA. In combination, the two courses will meet all the requirements of the International Association of Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (IABPA) Basic BPA Course. BPA is an investigative tool utilized by forensic scientists, crime scene technicians and investigators to identify bloodstain patterns at a crime scene, which may assist in reconstructing events. This course will introduce students to bloodstain pattern identification and analysis. Attention will be focused on how bloodstain analysis can be used to help facilitate criminal investigations. Prerequisite: CJ 115 or consent of instructor.

CJ 369  Advanced Bloodstain Pattern Analysis  (3)  

This is the second part of two courses in Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (BPA). Each course will cover different aspects of BPA. In combination, the two courses will meet all the requirements of the International Association of Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (IABPA) Basic BPA Course. BPA is an investigative tool utilized by forensic scientists, crime scene technicians and investigators to identify bloodstain patterns at a crime scene, which may assist in reconstructing events. Prerequisite: CJ 368.

CJ 370  Fire Investigation and Prevention  (3)  

Examines the principles of fire investigation, burn patterns, arson, fraud, industrial and commercial fire prevention, hazard recognition, fire control and suppression methods. Prerequisite: CJ 115 or consent of instructor.

CJ 375  Forensic Psychological and Criminal Profiling  (3)  

This course introduces students to the diverse ways in which the forensic psychologist participates in the legal system. Particular attention is given to the role of the forensic psychologist in criminal proceedings as it relates to the state of mind of the offender. The course also introduces students to basic theories of criminal profiling and ethical considerations in the use of profiling. Prerequisite: CJ 110 or CJ 115, or consent of instructor.

CJ 380  Terrorism  (3)  

An exploration of the incidence and threats of terrorism and an investigation of the security and law enforcement measures needed to combat it. Topics such as assassination, kidnapping, hijacking, extortion, sabotage, bomb threats/searches, hostage negotiations, victims’ survival, and medical/tactical reaction teams will be discussed as they relate to executive protection and terrorism.

CJ 382  Security Technologies  (3)  

This course provides an overview of the technologies used by security professionals and criminalists working in public safety. Emphasis is given to methods of assessing public and private security threat and managing security protection in government and industrial agencies, and digital, cyber and protective services. Prerequisites: CJ 130.

CJ 390  Special Topics  (1-3)  

Topics will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in advance. May be taken for more than one semester for variable credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

CJ 395  Seminar in Metropolitan Criminal Justice  (3)  

An overview of the functions, interrelations and problems of metropolitan law enforcement, judicial and correctional agencies is provided through lectures, assignments and agency visitations. Usually conducted in the Kansas City metropolitan area over a five-day period. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

CJ 400  Criminal Justice Research Methods  (3)  

This course allows students to learn and demonstrate knowledge of research methodology within the criminal justice system and become acquainted with the range and scope of quantitative and qualitative tools available to the criminal justice researcher. Prerequisite: 12 hours Criminal Justice or consent of instructor.

CJ 401  Criminal Justice Ethics  (3)  

An advanced exploration of the field of ethics as specifically applied to the criminal justice field. Theoretical ethics will be examined alongside a pragmatic and applied focus on the application of these ethical principles in a contemporary criminal justice professional environment. Prerequisite: None.

CJ 410  Criminal Procedure and Evidence  (3)  

Advanced analysis of the constitutional statutory foundations of modern criminal procedure will be emphasized, with particular focus on the 4th, 5th, and 6th Amendments. The law of search and seizure, interrogations and confessions, warrants, indictment/information, pretrial suppression and exclusionary rule applications will be presented. Rules pertaining to obtaining, qualifying and admitting evidence will be discussed, to include direct and cross examination, application of the hearsay rule, recognized privileged communications, and common evidentiary objections will be offered in the criminal prosecution/defense perspective.

CJ 415  Advanced Forensic Investigations  (3)  

Examines the role of forensic science in the investigation and solution of crime. Each type of physical evidence normally encountered in criminal investigation is studied with regard to collection and packaging techniques which maximize evidentiary value, the current types of scientific analyses available, and the significance and limitations of the scientific results. The history of forensic science is also briefly examined. Prerequisite: CJ 115 or consent of instructor.

CJ 416  Forensic Applied Science Laboratory  (3)  

This skills application course is designed to complement CJ 415 Forensic Investigations in Criminal Justice. Emphasis is given to the application of forensic investigation techniques and practices related to the preservation of evidence and the processing of crime scenes, including: processing latent prints, gathering trace evidence, documenting firearms and toolmarks evidence, and the collection of illicit drugs. Preparations for court testimony and presentation of evidence in court proceedings are covered. This course must be taken the smae semester as CJ 415. Prerequisite: CJ 115 or consent of instructor.

CJ 417  Probation, Parole and Community Based Corrections  (3-6)  

Crime scene investigation internships are created for CSI students to put their classroom-learned skills to real-life applications. Moreover, having an on-the-job training under a crime scene investigation unit will expose you to different specializations of your career choice such as photography skills at crime scenes; this way, you can choose which aspect of a CSI job to concentrate on. This internship requires summative reflection, serving as a culminating experience for Bachelor's degree students. Prerequisites: CJ 115, CJ 415, and Consent of Instructor.

CJ 420  Probation, Parole And Community Based Corrections  (3)  

Probation and parole, including the administration, procedures, and techniques used in the treatment and supervision of offenders. Also, the history and trends of probation and parole, and professional training in these fields. Prerequisite: CJ 120 or consent of instructor.

CJ 425  White Collar Crime  (3)  

Occupational crime, fraud, theft, computer crimes, environmental crimes, business and governmental crimes, and prevention measures. Prerequisite: CJ 110 or consent of instructor.

CJ 440  Enforcement Administration  (3)  

CJ 445  Drug Enforcement Policies and Programs  (3)  

The role in establishing alcohol and other drug policy and the development of regulation for the implementation of federal policy. Officials from federal, state, and local agencies describe agency functions and effects at addressing the drug problem. The course will also examine the impact of federal drug policy at the local level. Prerequisite: CJ 110 or consent of instructor.

CJ 455  Criminal Justice Administration  (3)  

This course provides an overview of the basic functions of criminal justice agency management and administration, including activities such as planning, forecasting, budgeting, organizing, training, evaluating and directing personnel. The special requirements for the administration of criminal justice agencies and facilities such as building public support, communicating results, informing policy decisions, maintaining transparency, and interacting with other criminal justice agencies are explored. Case studies from a variety of criminal justice settings including law enforcement, corrections, and courts are analyzed to enhance understanding of management and administrative complexities. Prerequisite: None.

CJ 465  Criminal Justice Planning  (3)  

Criminal Justice planning, including analysis of crime data and systems interrelations, forecasting, problem identification, establishing goals and objectives, and developing plans for implementation and evaluation.

CJ 470  Internship in Security  (3-6)  

CJ 475  Police Experience  (3)  

Travel to law enforcement agencies, guest lectures and class discussion. Prerequisite: CJ 110 or consent of instructor.

CJ 485  Internship in Criminal Justice  (3-6)  

Supervised observation & participation in the functions of a federal, state, or local criminal justice agency. Assignment supervision is received from experienced agency personnel and an orientation to agency operations is provided. Students may participate in specific law enforcement, corrections, forensic investigation, and/or security administration activities. The criminal justice internship may be taken in one semester or over the course of two semesters. Experience may be concentrated in one agency or divided among more than one agency. Placement and continuation in the internship requires approval of the criminal justice agency where the student completes their internship experience. This internship requires summative reflection and serves as a culminating experience for criminal justice students. Prerequisite: Permission of the course instructor.

CJ 495  Correctional Experience  (3)  

Impact course designed to provide the student with the opportunity to "experience" the correctional institution and draw a unique insight into corrections. Students visit correctional institutions, observe their operations, and interact with correction practitioners and confined offenders. Institutions have been chosen for visitation to provide the student with as broad a correctional experience as possible, beginning with juveniles through adults, including county, state, and federal institutions. Prerequisite: CJ 120 or consent of instructor.

CJ 499  International Travel Experience in Criminal Justice  (1-3)  

This course will provide students with an opportunity to earn course credit for participation in educational travel opportunities. These opportunities will incorporate elements of both travel and education, providing students with an applied opportunity to learn as they explore different locations. Prerequisite: Permission of the course instructor.

CJ 600  Seminar in Criminal Justice Systems  (3)  

This is a professional graduate seminar designed to engage the first-semester criminal justice graduate student in the analysis of the array of issues in the process of justice administration. Criminal Justice system operations are reviewed, and key issues impacting criminal justice theory and practice are explored. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 602  Criminal Justice Research  (3)  

The student will be able to develop and implement basic research designs and interpret findings. Both qualitative and quantitative methods will be examined. Instruction and application will focus upon criminal justice issues and the impact of criminal justice research upon the profession. Prerequisite: Admission to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 603  Issues in Criminal Procedure  (3)  

Current significant issues in criminal procedure will be addressed. Emphasis will be placed upon significance of recent judicial decisions to both enforcement and corrections. Additionally, the relationship between the judiciary and the other segments of the criminal justice system will be examined. Methods for conducting legal research will be examined. Prerequisites: Admission to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 604  Seminar in Criminal Justice Organization and Management  (3)  

This course will address the application of organizational, administrative and management principles in law enforcement, courts, and corrections. The course will examine issues in organizational structure, administration, problem solving, planning, and budgeting. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 605  Ethics in Criminal Justice  (3)  

The course will evaluate issues of professionalism and ethical behavior within the criminal justice profession. Key issues examined will include professional behavior of the individual and the agency. Current topics, such as sexual harassment, accreditation, and maintenance of standards, and community relations will be significant topics of focus. Prerequisite: Admission to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 610  Corrections in the United States  (3)  

This course will study the policies that affect modern correctional agencies in the United States. Corrections will be examined from a historical prospective to provide a benchmark for the analysis of current and future trends. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 620  Role of Law Enforcement in the United States  (3)  

Policies and human issues affecting law enforcement agencies in the United States will be addressed. Law enforcement will be examined from a historical prospective with analysis of current activities and expected future trends. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 625  Seminar In Criminological Theory  (3)  

Theories of crime causation and criminal behavior are discussed and researched. Theories are traced from the 1700's through modern times. Prerequisite: Admitted MCJ program.

CJ 630  Seminar in Correctional Administration  (3)  

The course will develop students' capacity to develop and evaluate policies and procedures in all parts of the correctional administration arena. Judicial decisions which impact the legal status of the operation of correctional institutions and offender confinement will be examined. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 635  Organized and White Collar Crime  (3)  

This course examines organized crime, white collar crimes, and gang activity in the United States. Focus will be on the historical development of these criminal patterns with an evaluation of current activities as well as proposed intervention theories. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 640  Seminar in Legal Issues in Law Enforcement  (3)  

Current significant issues in enforcement administration will be addressed. Emphasis will be placed upon significance to federal, state, and local enforcement administrators, their agencies, and their communities. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 645  Comparative Criminal Justice Systems  (3)  

This course studies the criminal justice systems of four to six major countries. Each country's different philosophical and practical approaches to criminal justice will be evaluated and compared. Field study will be utilized when possible. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 650  Seminar in Community Corrections  (3)  

The course will examine the traditional practices of probation and parole, as well as newer community methods. The major focus will be on the organization and integration of community-based programs into the modern criminal justice system. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 655  Seminar in Juvenile Justice And Delinquency  (3)  

This course addresses delinquency prevention policies, investigation of juvenile crime, dispositions of offenders, and judicial waiver issues. The Seminar also examines the roles and interaction of juvenile agencies' operations and the administrative challenges to them as well as a review of the due process considerations mandated by courts. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 660  Seminar in Operational and Staff Planning  (3)  

This course will examine principles and practical applications of operational and staff planning as applied to law enforcement agencies. Emphasis will be placed on the development and implementation of organizational goals and objectives, strategic, and tactical planning and operational needs assessment. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 670  Seminar in Correctional Law  (3)  

This course studies correctional law as related to probation and parole, juvenile and adult institutions, local jails, legal liabilities, and legal research. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 675  Problems & Practices in Judicial Administration  (3)  

In this course, students will examine the problems that face judicial administration and how those problems affect other elements of the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 680  Seminar in Staff Development  (3)  

This course examines the role of staff development in the management of human resources in criminal justice, and effective staff development methods and techniques. Emphasis will be placed on training and human resources development in criminal justice, organizationally determined outcomes, training needs assessment, performance standards, and assessment. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 685  Special Topics - Criminal Justice  (1-3)  

These courses offer an opportunity for students and faculty to explore topics of contemporary or historical interest that are not covered in regular course offerings. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 690  Directed Readings - Criminal Justice  (1-3)  

This course provides students with an opportunity to conduct an in-depth exploration of literature related to a particular criminal justice topic. Consent from the supervising professor is required. Directed readings courses must meet the Federal definition of a credit hour. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program and Instructor consent or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator and instructor permission.

CJ 692  Analytical Research and Statistics  (3)  

Statistical methods and computer applications are covered as they relate to survey research, agency evaluation, and content analysis. Qualitative methods are also taught and include field methods, historical research, and legal bibliography. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ Progrma and CJ 602 or permission of MCJ Program Coordinator.

CJ 693  Capstone Experience  (3)  

A Capstone course is a graduate course that typically serves as a comprehensive assessment of the knowledge and skills of a graduate student in the major field of study. It is usually completed at the end of the degree program. This Capstone course is a self-directed, integrated, learning opportunity. It is designed to integrate and synthesize all coursework in the criminal justice graduate program and related areas so the student has a broad conceptual and practical understanding of the criminal justice career field. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program, 24 hours of coursework completed (including all core coursework), and Instructor permission.

CJ 699  Thesis  (1-6)  

This course may be directed by any member of the criminal justice graduate faculty who accepts responsibility for supervising the thesis. The thesis topic must be pre-approved by the faculty advisor who serves as the student's graduate committee chair. The student normally conducts original empirical research which involves the collection and analysis of new data, or re-analyzing existing data to arrive at certain conclusions. The written Thesis report is submitted to the student's Thesis Committee for evaluation and approval. An oral defense of the Thesis is required for graduation. Prerequisite: Admitted to MCJ program, 24 hours of MCJ coursework (including all core coursework), and instructor permission.

CJ 777  Continuous Enrollment  (1-3)  

This course is to allow students additional time to complete Capstone, Thesis or Practicum requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.