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English (EN)

EN 100  Developmental English  (3)  

Small classes and individual attention, focusing on developing the basic habits of good writing through short writings and culminating in the writing of organized and developed themes. Does not count towards degree credit hour requirements or general education requirements.

EN 101  First Year Writing  (3)  

Study of and practice with the processes of writing for college courses, especially discovering, drafting, reflecting, revising, and editing. Further attention given to research: rhetorical reading, citation integration, and effective documentation. Required, with a minimum grade of C, for graduation. Prerequisite: None.

(Communication.)  

EN 102  Freshman English Honors  (3)  

The analysis of texts that purport to gather facts, to structure experience into pleasing formal structures, to persuade others to action, judgment, or evaluation, and to articulate principles whose power shapes diverse experiences into meaningful patterns of coherence. The writing of expository prose that communicates thoughtfully and clearly the results of those analyses. Open to those students accepted into the University Honors Program and by invitation from the Composition staff.

EN 103  Academic Reading & Research  (3)  

This course provides training and practice in academic reading, writing, and research for students who desire more focused instruction in using academic texts, including syllabi, rubrics, textbooks, and articles. There will be instruction and practice in different methods of reading and responding to texts in writing and orally. Students will read a variety of texts, including a book-length text, and will create a culminating project which synthesizes their course reading with personal research. Students who complete the course will be more confident and competent in their interactions with college-level texts. Prerequisite: None.

(General Ed Humanities. Communication.)  

EN 105  Introduction to English Studies  (3)  

This course provides a firm grounding in English as an academic discipline, covering a variety of concepts and approaches critical to English studies. The course will emphasize building students’ critical and creative vocabulary, knowledge, and skills in order to foster future success both in English coursework and in their academic careers more generally. Prerequisite: None.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

EN 110  Multicultural American Literature  (3)  

A study of literature written by, and expressing the perspectives of, authors from diverse ethnic, racial, and cultural groups in the United States, including but not limited to Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latino/a Americans, as well as multiracial, multicultural, and other culturally diverse Americans. Course readings include poetry, drama, fiction, and autobiographical non-fiction. Prerequisite: None.

(General Ed Humanities. Global Citizenship Ethics Div.)  

EN 112  Masterpieces of American Literature  (3)  

Focuses on celebrated and influential works of fiction, drama, and poetry by American authors from the late eighteenth through the early twenty-first centuries. Prerequisite: None.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

EN 113  Medieval Popular Culture  (3)  

In this course, students will discover what life, literature, and culture were like in the Middle Ages and how medieval culture has continued to influence popular culture throughout history up until the present day. From Tolkien's Lord of the Rings, to Game of Thrones in books and on TV, to Romances, to video games, to Renaissance painting and modern architecture, medieval culture has inspired all sorts of cultural forms and entertainments. Students' investigations into the world of medieval popular culture will be both critical and creative, seeking to understand culture and history, connect culture across periods, and enjoy the fun ways cultural products and ideas, especially but not only literature, are recycled over time in new contexts and for new purposes. Prerequisite: None.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

EN 116  Mystery Literature  (3)  

Mystery fiction, still a popular form of literature today, is a longstanding genre that has been evolving for the last two centuries. The course will examine some of the most important mystery writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. The mystery genre has taken several forms over the years, in large part due to the social history and culture of a particular time period. Over time the mystery genre has shifted from "the novel with a secret" to more complicated examinations of character, an emphasis on psychology over plot, and further explorations of both setting and theme. Many of the novels read are written by authors who became well-known in the mystery genre for developing a certain literary type, technique, or situation that other writers would continue to explore in the years that followed. The course will explore several prominent themes in this type of fiction, in particular the propensity for violence, murder, crime, and the appeal of other taboo subjects. The role of the reader is also critical to the genre as the shadow figure who in part determines which secrets are revealed or disguised, how the characters are developed for a connection to or isolation from the reader, and how the drama itself is written expressly for readers seeking the "thrill" of the mystery. Prerequisite: None.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

EN 131  Understanding Short Fiction  (3)  

This course provides an introduction to reading and analyzing short fiction, with a particular emphasis upon the short story. Readings will include works of short fiction from a range of historical and cultural contexts and will represent a variety of genres. Students will develop a critical vocabulary and analytical skills to foster better understanding of and appreciation for short fiction as a literary form.

(General Ed Humanities. Communication.)  

EN 133  Stories Around the World  (3)  

Focuses on modern and contemporary fiction by European, Latin American, Asian, Middle Eastern, and African authors.

(General Ed Humanities. Global Citizenship Ethics Div.)  

EN 135  Introduction to Literature  (3)  

The appreciation of literature showing relationships through analysis of different genres.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

EN 138  Kansas Literature  (3)  

A study of Kansas through its poetry, short stories, novels, and journalism. Lectures on Kansas history provide background as an aid to better understanding the literature. A study of the literature of pioneering, the small town, and contemporary accounts of Kansas, its land and people.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

EN 145  Shakespearean Afterlives  (3)  

This course considers Shakespeare’s plays and the methods and media used to revise and adapt those plays for modern audiences. Students will read selected Shakespeare plays and then read, watch, and play various adaptations and appropriations of those works, focusing on how and why Shakespeare and his plays continue to find new life in print and on-screen. Students will also have the opportunity to create and perform their own versions of Shakespeare’s work in the course. Prerequisite: None.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

EN 177  Science Fiction  (3)  

Selected novels and short stories depicting innovations and discoveries in science and their impact on people, society, and the universe.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

EN 178  Fantasy  (3)  

Selected novels and short stories depicting fictive worlds that contemporary knowledge considers impossible.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

EN 190  Film Appreciation  (3)  

Film as a mode of artistic expression with emphasis on selected films, short and feature-length, American and foreign, for understanding and appreciation. Stress will be given to the development of a “vocabulary” with which to discuss, criticize, and otherwise enjoy film art. May be repeated with a change of content.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking, Communication.)  

EN 192  Literature & Film  (3)  

A study of literary texts and their adaptations into the medium of film, with emphasis on the comparative strengths and weaknesses of each version. Stress will be given to the critical vocabulary shared by these narrative forms.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

EN 193  Types of Popular Culture  (3)  

Examination of subjects and themes in popular literature, with focus on the relationship between popular genres and the traditional canon. May be repeated with change of content.

EN 199  Special Topics - Writing/Reading  (1-3)  

A variable topic course in selected subjects in literature and language. See schedule for current offerings.

EN 206  Beginning Poetry Writing  (3)  

An introduction to and practice in the writing of poetry. Prerequisite: EN 101 or EN 102.

(General Ed Humanities. Communication.)  

EN 207  Beginning Nonfiction Writing  (3)  

An introduction to and practice in the writing of memoir, narrative essays, New Journalism, travel writing and other nonfiction forms. Prerequisite: EN 101 or EN 102.

(General Ed Humanities. Communication.)  

EN 208  Professional Writing  (3)  

A review of the basic essentials of business/technical usage and style, with emphasis on organizing ideas and managing basic business and technical writing forms. Prerequisite: EN 101 or EN 102.

(General Ed Humanities. Communication.)  

EN 209  Beginning Fiction Writing  (3)  

An introduction to and practice in the writing of the short story. Prerequisite: EN 101 or EN 102.

(General Ed Humanities. Communication.)  

EN 210  Mythologies in Literature  (3)  

A study of mythologies that have been a reference point for literature, focusing mainly on Greek and Roman materials, but drawing upon others such as Norse, Celtic, Gaelic, and Eastern. Readings will include both literary works and supplemental texts.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

EN 212  Sexuality & Literature  (3)  

Examines the various roles that sexuality, which includes categories such as intimacy, sex, gender, and sexual orientation, has played in literature and film.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

EN 214  Women & Literature  (3)  

This course surveys literature by women from the medieval to the contemporary periods. Particular attention is given to recurring themes and issues addressed by women writers, as well as how the intersection of gender with factors like class, race, and ethnicity impacts women’s experiences and their literary representation. Readings consist of representative works of fiction, poetry, drama, and select nonfiction by women of diverse backgrounds.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

EN 235  Survey of Drama I  (3)  

Greek to Elizabethan. Play reading in historical context. A study of the elements of production and performance practice and style which emerge representative of period. Periods: Greek, Roman, Medieval, Elizabethan. Nations: Europe, Britain, Japan, China, and India. Cross listed with TH 206. Cannot enroll for credit in both EN 235 and TH 206. Not regularly offered.

EN 236  Survey of Drama II  (3)  

Restoration to Modern. Play reading in historical context. A study of the elements of production and performance practice and style representative of the period. Periods: Restoration, French and Spanish Classicism, Neoclassicism, Realism, Impressionism. Cross listed with TH 207. Cannot enroll for credit in both EN 236 and TH 207. Not regularly offered.

EN 240  Introduction to Film Studies  (3)  

This course provides students with an introduction to the elements, techniques, and vocabulary critical to the study of film as a medium. The course will emphasize building students’ critical vocabulary, knowledge, and skills through the discussion of numerous films from various genres and historical periods. Prerequisite: None.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

EN 299  Special Topics - Reading/Writing  (1-3)  

A variable topic course in selected subject in literature and language. See schedule for current offering. Not regularly offered.

EN 300  Advanced College Writing  (3)  

Intensive writing and revision practice designed to help students develop skills needed to write successful analyses and arguments in their academic disciplines and their careers. Focus on critical thinking about how writing works in various appropriate contexts and on advanced research writing. Some sections for specific academic programs. Required, with a minimum grade of C, for graduation.

(Communication.)  

EN 301  Literary Criticism &Theory  (3)  

Practical criticism and writing, stressing the types and methods of critical approaches to literature, ancient and modern, and their application in the interpretation of literary works. Students taking the course for graduate credit will write a substantial additional paper focusing on one aspect of the relationship between critical theory and an individual work or author. Prerequisites: EN 101 or EN 102 and EN 300. For EN 601, admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 305  Advanced Fiction Writing  (3)  

Continued practice in fiction writing with special emphasis on technique. Students taking EN 605 will, in addition to the short stories due as work for 305, revise and edit their stories and write an introduction that shows how their practice of craft has been shaped by their experience in the course. Prerequisite: EN 209 or consent. For EN 605, admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 306  Advanced Poetry Writing  (3)  

Continued practice in poetry writing with special emphasis on technique. Students taking EN 606 will be required to select at least five of the poems due as work for 306 and write an introduction to those five that shows how their practice of craft has been shaped by their experience in the course. Prerequisite: EN 206 or consent. For EN 606, admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 307  Advanced Nonfiction Writing  (3)  

Continued practice in the writing of creative nonfiction, including but not limited to personal essay, memoir, literary journalism, travel and science writing. Students taking EN 607 will develop writing projects of considerable length and/or research depth. Prerequisite: EN 207 or consent. For EN 607, admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 308  Technical Writing  (3)  

A pre-professional writing course for students entering technical fields. Not regularly offered. Prerequisite: EN 300 or equivalent.

EN 309  ESL Methods & Cross-Cultural Communication  (3)  

Designed for those who work with non-English speakers. Special emphasis on improving intercultural understanding, on the interaction of language and culture, and on language learning and language teaching. Not regularly offered.

EN 310  English Grammar/Linguistics  (3)  

Description and analysis of English grammar, its smallest parts up through how those parts are expressed as meaningful discourse. Instruction in how to understand and discuss the English language effectively. Studies the dynamics (formal, historical, social) of language as a particularly human form of communication. Investigates what language is and how it works, how language changes and varies over time and place, and how language is used in social contexts. Students will learn major linguistic categories of phonology (sounds), morphology (words), syntax (sentences), and semantics (meaning), and ask questions about rules and standards of usage, as well as issues of style and politics as they pertain to English language use. Graduate students must write a substantial paper developing in greater detail one of the topics covered in the course. Prerequisite for EN 610: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 312  Theories of Persuasive Writing  (3)  

Study of theories about how people use language/writing persuasively to shape knowledge and opinion. The course focuses on selected theoretical readings from the history of mainstream and marginalized rhetorics. The course will build students’ understanding of rhetorical theory and their skill in using it to analyze persuasive writing in their areas of interest. Prerequisites: EN 101, First-Year College Writing. Completion of EN 300, Advanced College Writing, or simultaneous enrollment strongly recommended.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

EN 315  Reading as Writers  (3)  

Practice in the study of literature from a writer’s perspective, primarily exploring the elements of craft involved in creating literary art (point of view, voice, style, prosody, figurative language, diction, syntax). Through critical analysis, aesthetic investigation, and imitation, students will discover the various tools writers employ to create meaning. Students taking EN 615 will be expected to write a paper of 20 pages analyzing the elements of craft involved in one or more essays by a non-fiction writer chosen in consultation with the professor. Prerequisite for EN 615: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 320  Teaching Young Adult Literature  (3)  

This course provides pre-service teachers intensive instruction in ways to teach young adult literature at the middle school and high school levels, including a focus on reading strategies, response strategies, reading engagement and motivational strategies, discussion strategies, lesson design, and instruction. Attention will also be given to the content and history of young adult literature, the diversity inherent in the genre, and censorship and selection of young adult literature. Prerequisite: None.

EN 321  Teaching Composition  (3)  

Students will conduct, review, analyze, and discuss the teaching of composition, applying the best research-based strategies for elementary- and secondary-level learners from diverse perspectives. Pre-service teachers of literacy will explore writing as a process and develop instructional practices that will increase their students’ writing abilities across the curriculum. Students will also reflect on their learning as they study and practice instructional methods in microteaching opportunities. The course will emphasize the writing process, purposes of writing, grammar and conventions, response groups, multigenre writing, research writing, technology resources, struggling writer strategies, instructional practice and design strategies, and assessment and evaluation techniques. Prerequisites: EN 300.

EN 325  British Literature Through 1785  (3)  

Covers major literary movements, major authors, and the careful reading of masterpieces through 1785. Students in 625 will write a substantial paper, including scholarship, on selected works of a single author from the Middle Ages, Renaissance, or 18th Century on a topic chosen in consultation with the professor. Prerequisite for EN 625: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 326  British Literature since 1785  (3)  

This course examines the major literary movements in Britain from the Romantic period to the present in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. This class also surveys how the genres of poetry, the novel, the short story, and drama emerge and evolve through the late eighteenth to the early twenty-first centuries. Students in EN 626 will write an extended research paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite for EN 626: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 330  American Literature through 1865  (3)  

The course provides a survey of early American literature from pre-Columbian legends through the end of the Civil War. Graduate students will be required to investigate in depth one of the following areas: colonial literature, early national literature, or the literature of the American Renaissance. Prerequisite for EN 630: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 331  American Literature since 1865  (3)  

The course provides a survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present in historical and generic contexts. It stresses close readings of individual texts of fiction, poetry, and drama. Graduate students will select one major author and examine his/her treatment in literary criticism during last fifty years. Prerequisite for EN 631: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 332  Literature of American West  (3)  

Focuses on the fiction, but also includes the autobiographies, poetry, and/or essays, of authors shaped by the landscape, diverse peoples, and values of the American west.

(General Ed Humanities. Critical and Creative Thinking.)  

EN 336  Contemporary Theatre  (3)  

A study of developments in playwriting, directing, acting since WWI to the present with special emphasis on influences that have affected contemporary theatre and drama. Graduate students must prepare an oral report on an assigned work of literary (or dramatic) criticism and must write a research paper of 15-20 pages with full scholarly apparatus. Cross listed with TH 306. Cannot enroll for credit in both EN 336 and TH 306. Prerequisite for EN 636: admission to MLS program or consent. Not regularly offered.

EN 337  Short Story  (3)  

This course provides an introduction to the history and characteristics of the short story as a literary form. Students will read representative works of short fiction from a variety of cultural and historical contexts in order to better understand how writers have adapted the short story form to represent the diverse range of human experience.

EN 345  Shakespeare  (3)  

Students read, discuss, and write on some of Shakespeare’s poetry and a selection from the Comedies, Tragedies, and Histories. Consideration of historical and cultural contexts of the plays, as well as their performance history, will help us appreciate both the works and the culture which inspired them. Graduate students will conduct primary research on topics of their choosing. Prerequisite for EN 645: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 350  Major Authors  (3)  

The advanced study of a major literary author or two authors. Special attention will be paid to the evolution of an author's writing style within the historical and cultural framework in which he or she was writing. May be repeated with change of content. Prerequisite: None.

EN 360  World Literature through 1650  (3)  

This course focuses on close readings of masterpieces in world literature to 1650 in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Attention is given to authors and genres of central importance, and how emerging themes evolve over the centuries. Prerequisite: None.

EN 361  World Literature since 1650  (3)  

This course focuses on close readings of masterpieces in world literature from 1650 to the present in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Attention is given to authors and genres of central importance, and how emerging themes evolve. Prerequisite: None.

EN 370  Medieval Literature  (3)  

A survey of English literature in the Middle Ages with special emphasis on the works of Chaucer. Special attention to the contextual relationship of literature and the thought and culture of the period. Prerequisite for EN 670: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 371  Renaissance Literature  (3)  

A survey of the literature written from 1475 to 1660, focusing on major poets and dramatists, such as Spenser, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, and Milton, but also lesser-known writers such as the Countess of Pembroke and Aemilia Lanyer. Special attention to the contextual relationship of literature and the thought and culture of the period. Graduate students will additionally write a substantial research paper on a topic of their choosing. The course also requires two class presentations on selected writers of the period, drawing on current scholarly criticism. Prerequisite for EN 671: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 372  Restoration & 18th Century Literature  (3)  

A survey of the principal genres and major authors of literature written between 1660 and 1800. The course may emphasize a certain genre such as the novel or satire, or an individual author such as Jonathan Swift, Aphra Behn, Samuel Johnson, Henry Fielding, or Fanny Burney. Special attention to the contextual relationship of literature and the thought and culture of the period. Graduate students must present an oral report on an assigned work of literary (or dramatic) criticism and must additionally write a substantial research paper with full scholarly apparatus. Prerequisite for EN 672: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 373  Romantic & Victorian Literature  (3)  

Readings in Romantic and Victorian literature. The course begins with Wordsworth’s expressions of religion in nature, working through selections from the other major Romantics, and concludes with the prophetic and public solutions to the problems of industrial England offered by Carlyle, Tennyson, Ruskin, and Arnold. Special attention to the contextual relationship of literature and the thought and culture of the period. Graduate students must present an oral report on an assigned work and must additionally write a substantial research paper with full scholarly apparatus. Prerequisite for EN 673: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 374  Modern Literature  (3)  

Readings will cover the expressions of Modernism in all the major creative arts with primary focus on the reading and analysis of selected “modernist” literary writers from the genres of fiction, poetry, and drama. Some attention to defining the concept and historical parameters of “modernist”. Prerequisite for EN 674: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 375  Contemporary Literature  (3)  

Readings in the literary milieu from 1960 to the present in poetry, short fiction, and the novel with attention to the cultural, social, and historical context of individual works and their authors. Graduate students will additionally write a substantial paper, including contemporary scholarship, examining one author, theme, or movement from this period. Prerequisite for EN 675: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 376  Nineteenth Century American Literature  (3)  

Readings in nineteenth century American literature from the rise of literary nationalism through the Gilded Age,with special focus on the major literary movements of the period. Graduate students must write a research paper of 15-20 pages with full scholarly apparatus. Prerequisite: None.

EN 380  Modern Poetry  (3)  

Major British and American poets from about 1890 to 1945, including Yeats, Eliot, and Frost. Prerequisites: None.

EN 381  Drama  (3)  

A study of drama as a literary from. Students will read representative works of drama from a variety of contexts. Graduate students will complete additional assignments appropriate to the post-baccalaureate level. Prerequisite for EN 681: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 382  Modern Novel  (3)  

This course will examine the novel as a literary form, paying particular attention to the origins and development of the genre from the 18th century through to the contemporary period. Graduate students will complete additional writing and research in consultation with the professor. Prerequisite for EN 682: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 384  Publishing Lab  (3)  

Students gather, evaluate and edit creative manuscripts to produce and publish a literary magazine. Prerequisite: EN 305, EN 306, or EN 307.

EN 385  Directed Reading/Writing/Research  (1-3)  

Designed to investigate a field of special interest which will not be covered in detail in the courses offered by the department. After securing the approval of the chairperson of the department and the consent of a member of the department who is prepared to supervise their reading, students will carry out their projects with the supervising teacher. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

EN 390  Aspects of Film  (2-3)  

Variable specified content in film, such as the American novel into film, the science fiction film, western novels in film. May be repeated with change of content.

EN 393  Literature of Pop Culture  (3)  

The study of such individual literary topics as the western, detective fiction, sports literature, and prizewinning novels. Students taking this course as 693 will write a substantial paper, including scholarly research, examining one author, theme, or movement in the genre under consideration. The topic will be chosen in consultation with the instructor. May be repeated with change of content. Prerequisite for EN 693: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 396  Topics in Women & Literature  (3)  

An advanced study of the works of a major woman author, the women writers of a particular period or in a particular genre, or a thematic study of women writers Not regularly offered. Prerequisite: 3 hours of one of the following: EN 330, EN 331, EN 360, or EN 361. For EN 696: admission to MLS program or consent.

EN 399  Special Topics - Writing/Reading  (1-3)  

See schedule for the current offerings.

EN 400  Senior Seminar  (3)  

This capstone course serves as the culminating experience for the literature emphasis of the English major. Students work together as a class with a faculty member on a specific topic of ongoing research in the faculty member’s area of expertise. Prerequisites: English literature major, senior status, and consent.

EN 402  Internship  (1-3)  

Applicants should be majors and minors who have second semester junior or senior status, and the approval of their academic advisor and the internship coordinator. Interns will be supervised by the internship coordinator and a workplace supervisor(s). Prerequisites: 15 hrs. of English courses completed, including EN 105, EN 300, and 9 hours at the 300 level, as well as a 3.0 GPA in English coursework.

EN 499  Special Topics - Teaching and Study of English  (1-3)  

Special topics of a varying nature for teachers doing in-service work, for graduate students in education and English education, and upper-division English majors. Not regularly offered.

EN 601  Literary Criticism and Theory  (3)  

Practical criticism and writing, stressing the types and methods of critical approaches to literature, ancient and modern, and their application in the interpretation of literary works. Prerequisites: EN 101, or EN 102, or EN 300 or equivalent and admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 605  Advanced Fiction Writing  (3)  

Continued practice in fiction writing with special emphasis on technique. Additional requirement: Students taking EN 605 will, in addition to the 8 short stories due as work for EN 305, revise and edit 3 of their stories and write an introduction to those three that shows how their practice of craft has been shaped by their experience in the course. Prerequisites: EN 209 and admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 606  Advanced Poetry Writing  (3)  

Continued practice in poetry writing with special emphasis on technique. Additional requirement: Students taking EN 606 will be required to select at least five of the poems due as work for EN 306 and write an introduction to those five that shows how their practice of craft has been shaped by their experience in the course. Prerequisites: EN 206 and admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 607  Creative Writing, Nonfiction  (3)  

Continued practice in the writing of creative nonfiction, including but not limited to personal essay, memoir, literary journalism, travel and science writing. Students taking EN 607 will develop writing projects of considerable length and/or research depth. Prerequisites: EN 207 or consent. For EN 607, admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 610  English Grammar/Linguistics  (3)  

Surveys different points of view about language, including traditional grammar and an introduction to transformational grammar. Topics include: phonology, morphology, history of the language, psycho-linguistics, language acquisition, dialects, syntax and sentence combining, and their implications for language learning at all levels. Graduate students must write a 12-page paper developing in great detail one of the topics covered in class. Prerequisites: Admission to the MLS program and consent.

EN 615  Reading as Writers  (3)  

Practice in the study of literature from a writer's perspective, primarily exploring the elements of craft involved in creating literary art (point of view, voice, style, prosody, and figurative language, diction, syntax). Through critical analysis, aesthetic investigation and imitation, students will discover the various tools writers employ to create meaning. Additional requirements: Students taking EN 615 will be expected to write a paper of 20 pages analyzing the elements of craft involved in one or more essays by a nonfiction writer chosen in consultation with the professor. Prerequisites: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 620  Teaching Young Adult Lit  (3)  

This course provides pre-service teachers intensive instruction in ways to teach young adult literature at the middle school and high school levels, including a focus on reading strategies, response strategies, reading engagement and motivational strategies, discussion strategies, lesson design, and instruction. Attention will also be given to the content and history of young adult literature, the diversity inherent in the genre, and censorship and selection of young adult literature. Prerequisite: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 625  Survey of English Literature I  (3)  

Major literary movements, major authors, and the careful reading of masterpieces through the mid-eighteenth century. Special attention to the history of the English language as a literary medium. Additional requirements: students in EN 625 will write a fifteen-page paper on selected works of a single author from the middle ages, renaissance, or 18th century. The specific topic must be approved by the professor. Prerequisite: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 626  English Literature II  (3)  

Major literary movements, major authors, and careful reading of masterpieces from the romantic period to the present. Additional requirements: Students in EN 626 will write a fifteen-page paper, including scholarship, on selected works of a single author from the period. The specific topic will be arranged in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 630  American Literature I  (3)  

Survey of early American literature, from pre-Columbian legends through literature of 1850s. Graduate students are required to investigate in-depth one of the following areas: colonial, early national, or American Renaissance literature. Prerequisites: Admission to the MLS program or consent of instructor.

EN 631  American Literature II  (3)  

Survey of American literature from Civil War to present in historical and generic contexts. Stresses close readings of individual texts of fiction, poetry, and drama. Graduate students select one major author and examine their treatment in literary criticism during last fifty years. Prerequisite: Admission to MLS program and consent of instructor.

EN 636  Contemporary Theater  (3)  

A study of developments in playwriting, directing, and acting from WWI to the present with special emphasis on influences that have affected contemporary theater and drama. Additional requirements: Students must present an oral report on an assigned work of literary (or dramatic) criticism and must write a research paper of 15-20 pages with full scholarly apparatus. Prerequisites: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 645  Shakespeare  (3)  

Students read, discuss, and write on some of Shakespeare's poetry and a selection from Comedies, Tragedies, and Histories. Consideration of historical and cultural context of the plays, as well as their performance history, to help appreciate the works and the culture which inspired them. Graduate students conduct primary research on topics of their choosing. Prerequisites: Admission to the MLS program and consent of instructor.

EN 660  World Literature I  (3)  

Readings in the great works of world literature in translation (from Europe, Asia, Latin America, Africa) from ancient times to 1600. Additional requirements: Students will write a paper of substantial length explaining how knowledge of some aspect of world culture helps in the understanding of a work discussed in class. Scholarly references must be included. Prerequisites: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 661  World Literature II  (3)  

Readings in the great works of world literature in translation from 1600 to the present. Additional requirements: Students will write a paper of substantial length explaining how knowledge of some aspect of world culture helps in the understanding of a work discussed in class. Scholarly references must be included. Prerequisites: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 670  Medieval Literature  (3)  

Survey of English literature in the Middle Ages. Emphasis on the works of Chaucer. Includes the contextual relationship of literature and the thought and culture of the period. Prerequisite: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 671  Renaissance Literature  (3)  

A survey of the literature written from 1475 to 1660, focusing on major poets and dramatists, such as Spenser, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, and Milton, but also lesser-known writers such as the Countess of Pembroke and Aemilia Lanyer. Special attention to the contextual relationship of literature and the thought and culture of the period. Additional requirements: Graduate students will write one short analytical paper and a longer (15-20 pages) research paper on a topic of their choosing. The course also requires two class presentations on selected writers of the period, drawing out current scholarly criticism. Prerequisite for EN 671: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 672  Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature  (3)  

A survey of the principal genres and major authors of literature written between 1660 and 1800. The course may emphasize a certain genre such as the novel or satire, or an individual author such as Jonathan Swift, Aphra Behn, Samuel Johnson, Henry Fielding, or Fanny Berney. Special attention to the contextual relationship of literature and the thought and culture of the period. Graduate students must present an oral report on an assigned work of literary (or dramatic) criticism and must write a research paper of the 15-20 pages with full scholarly apparatus. Prerequisites: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 673  Romantic/Victorian Literature  (3)  

Readings in Romantic and Victorian literature. The course begins with Wordsworth's expressions of religion and nature, working through selections from the other major Romantics, and concludes with the prophetic and public solutions to the problems of industrial English offered by Carlyle, Tennyson, Ruskin, and Arnold. Special attention to the contextual relationship of literature and the thought and culture of the period. Additional requirements: Students must present an oral report on an assigned work and must write a research paper of 15-20 pages with full scholarly apparatus. Prerequisites: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 674  Modern Literature  (3)  

Readings will cover the expressions of Modernism in all the major creative arts with primary focus on the reading and analysis of selected "modernist" literary writers from the genres of fiction, poetry, and drama. Some attention to defining the concept and historical parameters "Modernists". Prerequisites: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 675  Contemporary Literature  (3)  

Readings in the literary milieu from 1960 to the present in poetry, short fiction, and the novel with attention paid to the cultural, social, and historical context of individual works and their authors. Additional requirements: Students will write a 20-page paper, including contemporary scholarship, examining one author, theme, or movement studied in the class. Prerequisites: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 680  Modern Poetry  (3)  

Major British and American poets from about 1890 to 1945, including Yeats, Eliot, and Frost. Graduate students will write a paper of approximately 20 pages, including critical apparatus, examining one author, theme, or movement from this period. Prerequisites: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 681  Drama  (3)  

The study of drama as a literary form. Additional requirements: Students will write a paper of 15-20 pages, including scholarly apparatus, examining one author, theme, movement, or context for dramatic literature. Prerequisites: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 682  Modern Novel  (3)  

A survey of the art and vision of the novel as a modern expression of world literature. Special attention to the contribution of non-western literature to the development of the narrative form. Additional requirements: Students will write a paper of 15-20 pages, including scholarly apparatus, examining a novel or novels from this period, the work to be chosen in consultation with the professor. Prerequisites: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 685  Directed Reading, Writing, Research  (1-3)  

Designed to investigate a field of special interest which will not be covered in detail in the courses offered in the department. After securing the approval of the chairperson of the department and the consent of a member of the department who is prepared to supervise their reading, students will carry out their projects with the supervising teacher. Prerequisite: Admission to the MLS program and consent of instructor.

EN 693  Literature of Popular Culture  (3)  

Study of such individual literary works as the western, detective fiction, sports literature, and prize-winning novels. May be repeated with change of content. Additional requirements: Students will write a paper of approximately 20 pages, including scholarly research, examining one author, theme, or movement in the genre under consideration. The topic will be chosen in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisites: Admission to the MLS program or consent.

EN 699  Spec Topics: Writing/Research  (1-3)  

A variable topic graduate-level course in selected subjects in literature and language. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.