two students walking outside a building on campus

Master of Education (MEd)

Admission to Graduate Programs

Students should meet with either the advisor or the department chairperson as soon as they decide they would like to begin a program of study in the Department of Education.

Before enrolling in any graduate courses, the student must:

  1. hold a bachelor’s degree from a regionally-accredited institution, and
  2. complete the online degree-seeking application for admission to Washburn University at www.applyweb.com/washburn/index.ftl. In addition, a Washburn University senior within six hours of graduation may apply to take graduate courses.

All requirements for formal admission to an advanced degree or licensure program must be completed no later than the completion of the first nine (9) semester hours of graduate course work taken at Washburn University.

Application Procedures

Admission requirements are subject to change. Candidates for advanced degree and licenses must check with their Graduate Program Advisor for requirements in effect at the time of admission to the Graduate Program. At the time of publication of this catalog, the requirements for formal admission to graduate degree and licensure programs were:

  1. Submit the University online graduate application admission form.
  2. Submit official transcripts of ALL undergraduate and graduate course work to the Department of Education Office.
  3. Have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better in graduate coursework or in the last 60 hours of undergraduate college coursework from accredited institutions.
  4. Have achieved the required scores on the Graduate Admissions Test, Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Miller Analogies Test (MAT).
  5. Submission of a University/Professional Reference.
  6. Sign and submit the Professional Conduct and Dispositions form.
  7. Provide a copy of current teaching license if appropriate.

The Graduate Program Committee carefully considers each application and makes the decision to formally admit or deny applicants. Students may reapply when all admissions criteria have been met. The student is notified in writing of the committee’s decision. Students may appeal any adverse decision by submitting a written petition to the Chairperson of the Department of Education. Upon receipt of such a petition, the committee will review the case and inform the student of their decision.

Transfer Credit

A maximum of nine (9) semester hours of courses taken at another institution may be approved by the Graduate Admission Committee if the courses fall within the time limit, if the other institution is regionally-accredited, and if a grade of B or better has been received.

MEd - Reading Specialist Program Requirements

RD 628Linguistics, Language Development, and Assessment3
ED 650Graduate Seminar (Methods and Cross-Cultural Comm)3
RD 610Literacy/ESOL Instructional Approaches3
RD 622Literacy/ESOL Instructional Strategies3
RD 684Literacy Instruction in the Middle and Secondary Content Areas3
RD 612Literature for Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults3
ED 665Introduction to Educational Research3
RD 616Teaching Writing in Classrooms3
RD 620Literacy and ESOL Assessment3
RD 626The Literacy/ESOL Specialist3
RD 630Literacy/ESOL Practicum3
RD 6xx Action Research Capstone1
Total Hours34

MEd - Special Education Program Requirements

Core Courses
ED 665Introduction to Educational Research3
ED 668Curriculum Development & Evaluation3
RD 622Literacy/ESOL Instructional Strategies3
Subtotal9
Adaptive Special Education Professional Courses
SE 610Learning and Behavioral Problems of Children and Youth with Mild-Moderate Disabilities3
SE 620Educational Planning for Children and Youth with Mild-Moderate Disabilities (Pre-School/Elementary)3
or SE 622 Educational Planning for Children and Youth with Mild-Moderate Disabilities (Middle/Secondary School
SE 630Methods and Materials for Teaching Mild-Moderate Disabled Children/Youth (Pre-School/Elem School)3
or SE 632 Methods and Materials for Teaching Mild-Moderate Disabled Children/Youth (Middle School/Secondary)
SE 635Conferencing and Consulting in Special Education3
SE 640Individual and Group Management for Children and Youth with Mild-Moderate Disabilities3
SE 656Special Education Practicum I (Pre-Elementary)3
or SE 658 Special Education Practicum I (Middle/Secondary)
SE 657Special Education Practicum II (Pre-Elementary)3
or SE 659 Special Education Practicum II (Secondary)
SE 660Assessment in Special Education (Pre-Elementary)3
or SE 662 Assessment in Special Education (Middle/Secondary)
SE 680Resources for Families with Disabilites3
Subtotal27
Total Hours36

MEd - Leadership Program Requirements

Core Courses
ED 665Introduction to Educational Research3
ED 682Leadership in Technology3
SE 610Learning and Behavioral Problems of Children and Youth with Mild-Moderate Disabilities3
ED 672Issues in Modern American Education3
ED 698Action Research Capstone1
Subtotal13
Building Leadership Professional Courses
ED 663Advanced Social Studies3
EA 664Creating and Evaluating the Instructional Program4
ED 665Introduction to Educational Research3
ED 667Curriculum Development and Evaluation - Elementary Education3
Total Hours26

Licensure - Only Building Leadership Program Requirements

Core Courses
Applicants must show evidence of completion of or enroll in the following core courses:
ED 672Issues in Modern American Education3
ED 665Introduction to Educational Research3
ED 682Leadership in Technology3
SE 610Learning and Behavioral Problems of Children and Youth with Mild-Moderate Disabilities3
Subtotal12
Building Leadership Professional Courses
ED 663Advanced Social Studies3
EA 664Creating and Evaluating the Instructional Program4
ED 665Introduction to Educational Research3
ED 667Curriculum Development and Evaluation - Elementary Education3
Subtotal13
Total Hours25

Licensure - Only District Level Leadership Program Requirements

Eligible candidates must hold a Building Level License

EA 673Creating a Systemic District Learning Culture4
EA 675Creating and Evaluating a Systemic Instructional Program4
EA 676District Level Management4
EA 677Building a Systemic Collaborative District Environment4
Total Hours16

MEd - Curriculum and Instruction

Educational Technology Emphasis

The Curriculum and Instruction program with an emphasis in Educational Technology is designed for educators interested in gaining knowledge about technology integration to support teaching and learning. The primary mission of the program is to develop educational leaders (teachers, administrators, and other educators) who are able to enhance curriculum and empower students using appropriate and effective instructional technologies. The program focuses on the appropriate, effective, and creative integration of technologies in all content areas and at all levels. Graduate students in the program develop skills and knowledge in the use of technology resources to support student learning. They examine how technology is changing the face of education and how those technologies can address diverse learners and learning situations. Current and emerging technologies demand that educators be reflective in the choice of methods, materials, technologies, and assessments to enhance and improve the teaching and learning process. The program provides a broad range of experiences for developing the skills, attitudes, and values of a reflective professional. All degree-seeking students must complete a capstone experience. See the advisors for details.

Educational Technology Program Requirements

Core Courses
ED 672Issues in Modern American Education3
ED 660Advanced Educational Psychology3
ED 665Introduction to Educational Research3
ED 668Curriculum Development & Evaluation3
Subtotal12
Required Educational Technology Courses
ED 685Issues in Educational Technology3
ED 680Integrating Technology in Curriculum 13
Subtotal6
Elective Courses
Recommended Electives:18
Multimedia in the Classroom
Integrating Internet Into Instruction
Emerging Technologies in Education
Leadership in Technology
Others approved by advisor
Subtotal18
A capstone experience is required for all Curriculum and Instruction graduates.
Total Hours36
1

ED 680 Integrating Technology in Curriculum requires a field experience that allows students to apply their skills and knowledge in a school or classroom setting.

MEd - Curriculum and Instruction

Literacy Emphasis

The Curriculum and Instruction program with an emphasis in Literacy is designed for educators interested in gaining knowledge and skills about literacy to enrich classroom teaching and learning. Students pursuing this program may select between two strands: Literacy, and Literacy for National Board Certification (NBC). Students selecting the second strand would be working toward National Board Certification along with the MEd in Literacy. Courses would support students pursuing national certification using NBC Standards in Literacy. All degree-seeking students must complete a capstone experience. See the advisors for details.

Literacy Program Requirements

This program design is tailored to the specific needs of a student pursuing a Master’s Degree in literacy. Students select courses approved by their program advisor to round out the 36 hour program. Independent Study topics must be approved by the program advisor and Department Chair.

Core Courses
ED 665Introduction to Educational Research3
ED 668Curriculum Development & Evaluation3
Subtotal6
Area of Concentration
Electives - must be approved by advisor30
Subtotal30
Total Hours36

Area of Concentration

Electives to complete a total of 36 hours - must be approved by advisor.

RD 610Literacy/ESOL Instructional Approaches3
RD 612Literature for Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults3
RD 616Teaching Writing in Classrooms3
RD 684Literacy Instruction in the Middle and Secondary Content Areas3
RD 620Literacy and ESOL Assessment3
RD 622Literacy/ESOL Instructional Strategies3
RD 628Linguistics, Language Development, and Assessment3
ED 672Issues in Modern American Education3
ED 680Integrating Technology in Curriculum3
ED 684Multimedia in the Classroom3
ED 686Integrating Internet Into Instruction3
ED 687Emerging Technologies in Education3
ED 674Special Topics/Education3
ED 697Independent Study in Education3

MEd - Curriculum and Instruction

Educational Studies

The Curriculum and Instruction program with an emphasis in Educational Studies is designed for educators and others interested in studying education from multiple perspectives. This online program provides opportunities to develop an understanding of major issues influencing educational environments through the lenses of a broad range of discipline specific areas of education. Educational Studies in Education is appropriate for teachers and other school personnel who are not interested in an advanced teaching license, but who would like to focus on the interdisciplinary nature of education at the graduate level. All degree-seeking students must complete an Action Research project on an educational issue of their choosing, from an interdisciplinary perspective. The Educational Studies emphasis requires 31 credit hours. All courses listed are required. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Educational Studies Program Requirements

Core Courses
The following seven semester hours are required:
ED 672Issues in Modern American Education3
ED 665Introduction to Educational Research3
ED 698Action Research Capstone1
Subtotal7
Additional Courses 1
Literacy Courses
The following six semester hours are required:
RD 610Literacy/ESOL Instructional Approaches3
RD 622Literacy/ESOL Instructional Strategies3
Technology Courses
Select six credit hours from the following:6
Integrating Technology in Curriculum
Multimedia in the Classroom
Integrating Internet Into Instruction
Special Education Courses
The following six semester hours are required:
SE 610Learning and Behavioral Problems of Children and Youth with Mild-Moderate Disabilities3
SE 680Resources for Families with Disabilites3
English for Speakers of Other Languages Courses
The following six semester hours are required:
ED 651Language Problems of non-English Speakers3
ED 671ESOL Teaching and Learning3
Subtotal24
Total Hours31
1

The courses listed below are recommended. However, other courses may be substituted with the permission of the student’s advisor.

Degree and Licensure Requirements

To receive the Master of Education degree and/or license, the student must complete the approved Program of Study subject to the following conditions:

  • All course work must be completed within six (6) calendar years.
  • A cumulative GPA of 3.0 must be maintained in all graduate work.
  • A maximum of six (6) semester hours of “C” credit may be counted.
  • Any grade below C will not be accepted.
  • Correspondence courses will not be accepted.
  • A maximum of nine (9) semester hours of courses taken at another institution may be approved by the Graduate Admission Committee if the courses fall within the time limit, if the other institution is regionally-accredited, and if a grade of B or better has been received. At least three-fourths of the semester hours required for the degree must be earned at Washburn University.
  • A maximum of three (3) semester hours of Independent Study credit may be counted.
  • A minimum of twenty-one (21) semester hours of courses must be at the 500 level or above.
  • Licensure candidates must have three years of full-time licensed employment to obtain Institutional Recommendation for licensure.
  • Degree candidates must complete one of the following capstone experiences: written comprehensive examination, thesis, portfolio, comprehensive paper, or action research project.

Course Offerings

Courses at the 600 level are open only to graduate students.

Education

ED 614  Guidance in Elementary/Secondary Schools  (3)  

Role of the classroom teacher and administrator in guidance and counseling program of the elementary/secondary school. Emphasis on unique needs of elementary children in regular, mainstream, and special classes. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

ED 633  Advanced Child Development  (3)  

Advanced course in theory and basic concepts of child development. Topics include assumptions and principles of five major approaches: normative-maturation, psychoanalytic, social learning, cognitive-development and behavior analysis. Includes historical background of developmental theory and cross cultural perspectives. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

ED 641  Language and Literature Development in Early Childhood Education  (3)  

Students identify speech and language behaviors which are developmentally appropriate for young children birth to age eight. Students identify and practice methods and techniques necessary to foster listening, speaking, pre-writing, pre-reading, and pre-math skills in children birth to five years of age.

ED 644  Art in Elementary/Middle School  (3)  

Understanding the purpose behind the crative process as it applies to teaching and evaluating art produced by the child. Relates various art experiences to students' developmental and emotional level. Applies elementary, middle, and secondary art experiences to the "regular" classroom.

ED 645  Introduction to Craft Techniques  (3)  

Lectures and demonstrations covering a variety of craft materials utilized in the elementary, middle, and secondary schools. Includes experience and practice with block printing, fabric art, casting and molding techniques, and safety standards associated with the craft production.

ED 647  PreKindergarten and Kindergarten Methods  (3)  

Focus on methods and materials that support physical, emotional, social and intellectual needs of the kindergarten and pre-kindergarten child.

ED 650  Graduate Seminar  (3)  

This course serves as an orientation to the Washburn Teacher Education Program as well as an exploration of the teaching profession for students pursuing an initial teaching license at the graduate level. Students will be introduced to the social, historical, and philosophical foundations of education, as well as a variety of teaching models, and the planning and assessment practices expected of all teachers. A review of influences on P-12 students' individual family, and community characteristics on the teaching and learning process will also be explored. The process for developing the education department required professional portfolio is included. A minimum of a 35 hour school/community field experience is required. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ED 660.

ED 651  Language Problems of non-English Speakers  (3)  

Emphasis on practical methods of teaching ESL and strategies for working with speakers of other languages. Includes a review of resource materials, lesson planning, and in-class teaching practice as well as an analysis of problems posed by conflicting cultural and language habits. May be taken for undergraduate credit and EN 499 for graduate credit.

ED 652  Cognitive & Language Development  (3)  

Emphasizes study of two essential areas of human development as they apply to early childhood teaching and learning: theoretical perspectives and research on cognitive and language development and instructional knowledge which provides understanding of teaching and learning that demonstrate instructional strategies grounded in theory and research.

ED 653  Assessment & Evaluation in Early Childhood Education  (3)  

Students learn ways in which young childrens' development is assessed and evaluated. Typical assessment procedures appropriate to children to age eight are studied. Techniques are developed to record childrens' behavior individually and in group settings. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ED 660  Advanced Educational Psychology  (3)  

Explores advanced topics in educational psychology as they apply to teacher practice. Topics include learning theory, child and adolescent psychology, theories of motivation and achievement, and social and cultural influences on learning and development. Part of the graduate core curriculum. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ED 661  Exceptional Infants & Young Children  (3)  

Survey of exceptionalities including etiology, curriculum, identification, adaptation of materials and environments, play, referral and development of an individual educational plan (IEP). Prerequisite: ED 343 or equivalent course in child development.

ED 662  Methods of Teaching English-Secondary  (4)  

Study of and practice in the methods of teaching literature, language, and writing in the secondary schools. Major concerns include teaching theory; the relationship between oral and written language; language development; language used in various social, regional, and cultural settings; curriculum development and evaluation; and the assessment of students' progress in reading and writing. Students participate in a field-based experience at various secondary schools. Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Teacher Education Program or consent of instructor.

ED 663  Advanced Social Studies  (3)  

Advanced survey and analysis of issues and practice of social studies education in elementary/middle school. Innovative approaches for teaching history, social issues, psychology, political science, anthropology, and/or philosophy in the classroom are explored. Emphasis on the content and materials of a variety of topics within the social science field. May be taken for undergraduate or graduate credit.

ED 665  Introduction to Educational Research  (3)  

Introduces graduate students to basic information needed to understand processes to plan, conduct, and report research on education-related issues and problems. Focus on increasing students' appreciation of the field of educational research, while increasing their ability to interpret and evaluate published research studies. Both qualitative and quantitative research methodologies are reviewed. Part of the graduate core curriculum.

ED 667  Curriculum Development and Evaluation - Elementary Education  (3)  

Examination of social and psychological influences upon curricular design and implementation. Emphasis on study of the societal forces which affect school curricula, prominent instructional models and supporting theoretical rationale, barriers on implementation of innovative curricula, and systematic evaluation of educational programs. Students review the process of curricular modification from a perspective integrating theory and practice.

ED 668  Curriculum Development & Evaluation  (3)  

An examination of social and psychological influences upon curricula design and implementation. Emphasis is placed upon study of the societal forces which affect school curricula, prominent instructional models and their supporting theoretical rationale, barriers of effective implementation, innovative curricula modification from a perspective of theory and practice.

ED 669  Curriculum Development and Evaluation - Secondary Education  (3)  

Examination of social and psychological influences upon curricular design and implementation. Emphasis on study of the societal forces which affect school curricula, prominent instructional models and supporting theoretical rationale, barriers on implementation of innovative curricula, and systematic evaluation of educational programs. Students review the process of curricular modification from a perspective integrating theory and practice.

ED 670  Curriculum Development and Evaluation - Middle/Secondary School  (3)  

Examination of social and psychological influences upon curricular design and implementation. Emphasis on study of the societal forces which affect school curricula, prominent instructional models and their supporting theoretical rationale, barriers on implementation of innovative curricula, and systematic evaluation of educational programs. Students review the process of curricular modification from a perspective integrating theory and practice. May be taken for undergraduate or graduate credit.

ED 671  ESOL Teaching and Learning  (3)  

This course will provide an overview of curriculum and instruction as it relates to ESOL learners. Candidates will learn appropriate teaching strategies and subject matter content relevant to this population. An emphasis will be placed on understanding language and literacy acquisition and working with students with special needs.

ED 672  Issues in Modern American Education  (3)  

Critical analysis of contemporary problems and issues in American education. Consideration of historical, sociological, and philosophical foundations affecting problems and issues included. This course is part of the graduate core. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

ED 674  Special Topics/Education  (0-3)  

Courses in special topics which will vary from semester to semester and will be announced in advance. ED 674 may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Department Chairperson and the instructor.

ED 678  Organization & Administration of Early Childhood Education Program  (3)  

Organization and administration of early childhood programs. Emphasis on supervision of volunteers and paraprofessionals. Introduces the student to techniques for organizing staff as an instructional Early Childhood Education team.

ED 680  Integrating Technology in Curriculum  (3)  

Presents students with principles underlying selection and use of technology to enhance learning. Examines software and multimedia technologies contributing to the instructional process. Prerequisites: ED 667 or ED 669.

ED 682  Leadership in Technology  (3)  

Provides guidance regarding varying aspects of technology implementation, including software/hardware acquisitions, funding, and staff development. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ED 684  Multimedia in the Classroom  (3)  

Multimedia gives teachers and students powerful new tools for teaching and learning by combining technologies such as video, audio, graphics, interactivity and text. Students in this course will learn how to identify, choose, plan for, produce and integrate multimedia into instruction.

ED 685  Issues in Educational Technology  (3)  

Critical exam of historical, sociological, philosophical foundations and implications of the implementation and use of technology in an educational setting.

ED 686  Integrating Internet Into Instruction  (3)  

The Internet is providing many educational opportunities for the connected classroom. This course will investigate the various components of the Internet such as the World Wide Web, telecommunications and other resources for use in the classroom. Students will learn to find, identify, evaluate and utilize Internet resources for instruction.

ED 687  Emerging Technologies in Education  (3)  

Technology is a constantly changing and ever evolving process. Many new emerging technologies hold promise for application for learning in the classroom. Students in this course will explore new technologies, evaluate them and determine their applicability for the classroom.

ED 688  Using Technology with Special Needs Students  (3)  

Using technology, including computers to enhance education of students with exceptionalities. Prerequisite: ED 300, Graduate standing, and either ED 302, or SE 476.

ED 690  Tests and Measurements  (3)  

Evaluation procedures as an integral part of the teaching/learning process. Involves identifying and defining intended learning outcomes, writing educational objectives, constructing and selecting various evaluation instruments, and interpreting and using test results to improve instruction. Emphasis on criterion and norm-referenced tests of ability and achievement as well as tests of individual assessment. May be taken for undergraduate or graduate credit.

ED 694  Philosophy of Education  (3)  

Historical and contemporary analysis of philosophical perspectives concerning the educational process. Develops and traces schools of educational thought in an effort to help students clarify their own educational philosophy. Emphasis on relationship between educational philosophy and practice. May be taken for undergraduate or graduate credit.

ED 696  Thesis  (3-6)  

Research design and analysis of action research or library research study. Culminating activity for graduate students interested in research or advanced study. Professional lab experiences in child study, innovative problems constitute the typical projects for thesis designs. Prerequisite: ED 665 and permission of Education chair.

ED 697  Independent Study in Education  (1-3)  

Independent research for graduate students investigating a special problem in a specific areas. Prerequisite: Chair consent.

ED 698  Action Research Capstone  (1-2)  

ED 698 Action Research Capstone (1-2) Students will identify a question about their own teaching or school practices, review the current research literature, develop a plan to collect data, collect and analyze their data, identify emergent themes, write an action research paper, and present their project and findings to the faculty committee. The objectives of the action research project are to help students understand the research process in an educational setting; provide students with the opportunity to study and improve their 55 own teaching through an action research project; and to show students how research can have a positive effect on school improvement and change. Prerequisites: Admission to the graduate program, successful completion of at least 18 credit hours of course work and successful completion of ED 665 Educational Research.

Educational Administration

EA 663  Building a School Learning Culture  (4)  

This course is designed as a foundational course for aspiring Building Level Administrators. The course will provide building leaders information to develop a school vision and to build an environment for a successful school learning culture. Course assignments will help future building administrators learn how to create and sustain a collaborative school vision, how to assess and encourage a healthy learning culture, and how to develop and maintain a rigorous and coherent instructional program. The course will include a one-credit hour practicum where the building level candidate will practice and implement the course objectives in a real-life setting. Prerequisite: Departmental Permission.

EA 664  Creating and Evaluating the Instructional Program  (4)  

This course will prepare aspiring school building administrators to develop and revise curriculum and instruction within the building, including the differentiation of instruction to meet the needs of all students. Learning how to provide supports for all students will be an essential element of this course. Teacher evaluation models will be explored along with how professional development can improved and enhance teacher performance. The course will include a one-credit hour practicum where the building level candidate will practice and implement the course objectives in a real-life setting. Prerequisite: Departmental permission.

EA 666  Building Level Management  (4)  

This course is one of the four courses required for building level leadership licensure. The course will cover topics regarding the management of a school building, including budgeting, facility management, instructional scheduling, building wide discipline management, and capacity for building leadership. The course will include a one-credit hour practicum where the building level candidate will practice and implement the course objectives in a real-life setting. Prerequisite: Departmental permission.

EA 667  Leading and Engaging a Collaborative Environment  (4)  

This course deals with communication within the school and the greater school community, including parents and community partners. Building relationships and practicing distributed leadership concepts are also a part of this course. All aspects of school improvement will be explored including the professional responsibility and ethics within the school community. The course will include a one-credit hour practicum where the building level candidate will practice and implement the course objectives in a real-life setting. Prerequisite: Departmental permission.

EA 673  Creating a Systemic District Learning Culture  (4)  

This course is designed as a foundational course for aspiring District Level Administrators. The course will provide district leaders information to develop a district vision and to build an environment for a successful district learning culture. Course assignments will help future district administrators learn how to create and sustain a collaborative district vision, how to assess and encourage a healthy learning culture, and how to maintain and support a rigorous and coherent instructional program. The course will include a one-credit hour practicum where the district level candidate will practice and implement the course objectives in a real life setting. Prerequisite: Departmental permission

EA 674  Spec Topics In Ed Admin  (1-3)  

Topics vary each semester & are announced in advance. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Chair & instructor consent.

EA 675  Creating and Evaluating a Systemic Instructional Program  (4)  

This course will prepare aspiring district administrators to review, evaluate, and lead revision of curriculum and instruction at a district level, including the differentiation of instruction to meet the needs of all students. District level supports of all students through special education, general education intervention, behavior interventions, and other supports will be addressed. Teacher and principal evaluation models will be explored along with how professional development can improved and enhance teacher and principal performance. The course will include a one-credit hour practicum where the building level candidate will practice and implement the course objectives in a real-life setting. Prerequisite: Departmental permission.

EA 676  District Level Management  (4)  

This course is one of the four courses required for district level leadership licensure. The course will cover topics regarding the management of a school district, including district finances and budgeting, facility management and maintenance, human resources, and policies for district welfare and safety. The course will include a one-credit hour practicum where the building level candidate will practice and implement the course objectives in a real-life setting. Prerequisite: Departmental permission.

EA 677  Building a Systemic Collaborative District Environment  (4)  

This course deals with communication with the school district and the greater school community, including parents, community partners, and school board relations. A particular focus on district improvement plans and the involvement of district leadership in this process will be an essential element of this course. The course will include a one-credit hour practicum where the building level candidate will practice and implement the course objectives in a real-life setting. Prerequisite: Departmental permission.

EA 681  Basic Concepts of Educational Administration  (3)  

Introduction to basic concepts underlying school building administration. Theory and practice of educational administration is analyzed and major concepts of formal organization, motivation, authority, leadership, decision making, conflict in organization, and organizational change are analyzed. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

EA 683  School Supervision and Staff Development  (3)  

Improves the instructional competencies of teachers and to help those in supervisor positions develop competencies necessary to help others improve instructional performance. Topics include the characteristics of effective instruction, alternative instructional strategies and alternative supervisory models. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

EA 684  School Finance & Business Administration  (3)  

Describes forms of school revenue including ad valorem tax and bonded indebtedness; appropriate school accounting methods according to the Kansas Department of Education; and models for effective business management. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

EA 686  School Law and Ethics  (3)  

The legal rights, duties, and responsibilities of school personnel. Specific topics in this course include due process, tort liability, negligence, and contracts. Basic legal relationships between employer, colleagues, pupils, and adults are addressed. A focus is also placed on the basic principles of ethical behavior established by legal and professional organizations, moral and legal consequences of decision making in schools, and the relationship between ethical behavior, school culture, and student achievement. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EA 688  Elementary/Middle School Principalship  (3)  

Role and responsibility of the principal in organizing, administering, and supervising the elementary school. Examines the multifaceted role of the building administrator. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

EA 689  The Building Leader  (3)  

The role and responsibility of the school principal in organizing, administering, and supervising the pre-K-12 school. This course examines the multifaceted role of the building administrator. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

EA 692  School Community Relationships  (3)  

Development of effective skills in communication, group facilitation, interpersonal relations, climate-building, conflict resolution, and relationships to the publics served. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.

EA 694  Practicum I Educational Administration  (3)  

Series of structured, field-based experiences in elementary, middle or secondary school to demonstrate competency in such administrative areas as: discipline, scheduling, counseling, financial management, line/staff relationships, professional personnel and other leadership skills. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

EA 695  Practicum II in Educational Administration  (3)  

Supervised field-based experience for the superintendent candidate to demonstrate competencies identified through the NCATE/ELCC categories. Field candidates will demonstrate competency in the area of finance, facilities, human resources, curriculum leadership, and other designated leadership skills. Candidates will develop an experience portfolio to validate job skills. Prerequisite: Building level licensure/certification.

EA 696  Human Resources Management  (3)  

This course deals with personnel policies and issues in the following areas of human resources: teacher recruitment, orientation, evaluation, promotion, termination, tenure, retirement, and related areas. Included will be an emphasis on adherence to legal aspects of the personnel function as well as dealing with professional organizations. Prerequisite: Building Level Licensure/Certification.

EA 697  School Planning/Facility Management  (3)  

This course is designed for aspiring school superintendents and central office leaders. This course will prepare school leaders to be proactive in developing educational specifications for school buildings thereby enhancing the educational process. This course includes the planning procedures for new buildings, remodeling and/or retrofitting buildings. Community and school surveys, site selection, design and maintenance and operations of school buildings are also components of the course. Prerequisite: Building Level Licensure/Certification.

EA 698  The District Leader  (3)  

This course is designed for individuals who wish to become central office administrators. The course emphasizes sound administration of financial, material, and human resources as necessary for optimal realization of the goals of the school district. Effective public school administrators must understand the systems principles and leadership potential which are found in the area of central office administration. Relationships with the board, community, staff, and students are a major focus. Prerequisite: Building Level Licensure/Certification.

Reading Specialist

RD 610  Literacy/ESOL Instructional Approaches  (3)  

This course is designed to investigate theories and practices of reading instruction with the goal of improving literacy instruction in the classroom. Students learn various current theories of the reading and writing processes as well as the internal and external variables that affect the acquisition of literacy skills. From these theories students are encouraged to adopt a personal view of the literacy process upon which instructional decisions as critical and reflective professionals in classrooms with diverse cultural and learning needs can be made. Current literacy research that supports instructional decision-making for native English speakers and ESOL learners will be infused throughout the course. Theory, which forms the basis for the course, is balanced with concern for practical applications in the classroom. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

RD 612  Literature for Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults  (3)  

This course examines literature across P-12 levels with an emphasis on how literature can be used in the development of literacy skills, including with learners whose native language is not English. Students will explore a variety of literature, including multicultural books, picture books, award winning books, poetry, and non-fiction books. Students will explore trends and issues in literature, including censorship, gender bias, cultural representation, as well as others. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

RD 616  Teaching Writing in Classrooms  (3)  

Current approaches to teaching writing based on whole language philosophy across a K-9 curriculum. Instructional strategies for improving writing skills through a writing workshop and methods of evaluating writing including portfolio assessment will be emphasized. Explores current issues and recent research findings relating to teaching writing.

RD 618  Integrating Language Arts in Classrooms  (3)  

Current approaches to teaching communication skills based on whole language philosophy across a K-9 curriculum. Instructional strategies for developing oracy and literacy skills are based on an integrated language arts perspective and include the development of thematic planning and reading workshop. Explores current issues and recent research findings relating to teaching language arts.

RD 619  Literacy for Young Adults  (3)  

Study of books read by young adults between 12 and 18. Covers history of young adult literature, the relationship between children's and young adult literature, censorship and selection, and teaching methods.

RD 620  Literacy and ESOL Assessment  (3)  

Principles and techniques of assessment of literacy skills of learners whose native language is English and in ESOL settings. Students will examine purposes for assessment, types of assessments (including formal and informal assessment procedures), analyzing assessment data, and evaluating learners’ strengths and areas of need to determine goals for instruction. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

RD 622  Literacy/ESOL Instructional Strategies  (3)  

The scope of this course includes the principles and techniques of literacy instruction for learners whose native language is English and for ESOL learners with diverse learning needs. Current research in literacy provides the basis for understanding the needs of learners and the best strategies for assisting them. Focus on learning will be on making critical and reflective decisions in selecting the most appropriate strategies, resources, and materials for readers who exhibit specific strengths and challenges in reading. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

RD 624  Practicum in Reading  (3)  

Supervised clinical experience with learners who exhibit reading problems. Students administer tests, analyze data, determine reader's strengths and weaknesses, develop an instructional plan, select and implement appropriate strategies and materials, and assess progress towards instructional goals. Prerequisites: RD 610, RD 620, and RD 622.

RD 626  The Literacy/ESOL Specialist  (3)  

A seminar in the role of the literacy specialist and ESOL specialist in elementary, middle, or secondary school settings with emphasis on the knowledge and skills necessary to think and act as a literacy/ESOL professional with students, teachers, paraprofessionals, administrators, professional colleagues, and the community. This course will focus on federal, state, and local literacy/ESOL programs, current research and curricular practices, historical and current trends and issues in the field of literacy and ESOL, and organizations which support and advocate for literacy, ESOL learners, and literacy/ESOL specialists.

RD 628  Linguistics, Language Development, and Assessment  (3)  

Principles of the processes of language development including factors which affect language development, the stages of language acquisition, and the relationship between oral language and literacy. Focus on developing assessment procedures and instructional strategies to facilitate language development. The course also focuses on language and linguistics in ESOL settings, including first and second language acquisition processes; English phonology, morphology, syntax, and discourse; and implications for teaching English language learners. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

RD 630  Literacy/ESOL Practicum  (3)  

A supervised clinical experience in which students work with learners to improve their literacy skills. Students administer assessments, analyze data, determine learners’ strengths and weaknesses, develop instructional plans, select and implement appropriate strategies and materials, and assess progress towards instructional goals using skills developed as critical and reflective professionals. Appropriate conduct is maintained with parents and classroom teachers with oral or written reports as deemed appropriate. Prerequisites: RD 610 and RD 612 and RD 620 and RD 622 and RD 628

RD 656  Advanced Children's Literature  (3)  

Advanced survey and analysis of the literature written for children through middle school. A variety of literary forms are explored. Emphasis on evaluation and development of specific strategies to enhance reader comprehension and appreciation. Emphasis also on incorporating children's literature in instruction across the curriculum.

RD 684  Literacy Instruction in the Middle and Secondary Content Areas  (3)  

A study of the specific literacy skills relating to the various disciplines found in middle and secondary schools. Emphasis is given to the importance of text complexity and readability, academic vocabulary acquisition, comprehension skills, use of text-based evidence, critical & analytical reading and writing, reading strategies (both universal and discipline specific), and working with ESOL learners. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

Special Education

SE 610  Learning and Behavioral Problems of Children and Youth with Mild-Moderate Disabilities  (3)  

Social, cognitive, behavioral, educational, medical aspects of development to establish etiology, characteristics, and best practice interventions for children and youth with learning and behavioral problems and theories of the causes of learning and behavioral problems. Emphasis on identifying disabilities according to state guidelines, utilizing appropriate assessment data, engaging in multi-disciplinary planning, and developing appropriate interventions. Prerequisite: ED 302 or SE 476.

SE 620  Educational Planning for Children and Youth with Mild-Moderate Disabilities (Pre-School/Elementary)  (3)  

Introduction to programming, planning and scheduling procedures to structure the learning environment for pre-school and elementary students with learning and behavioral problems. Emphasis on establishment of procedures for laws and regulations, regular class integration, student and teacher time management, class scheduling, grading practices, and student/program evaluation. The Individual Educational Planning (IEP) process and training in development of computerized IEP included. Prerequisite: SE 610.

SE 622  Educational Planning for Children and Youth with Mild-Moderate Disabilities (Middle/Secondary School  (3)  

Introduction to programming, planning and scheduling procedures to structure the learning environment for middle and secondary school students with learning and behavioral problems. Emphasis on establishment of procedures for regular class integration, student and teacher time management, class scheduling, grading practices, and student/program evaluation. Prerequisite: SE 610.

SE 630  Methods and Materials for Teaching Mild-Moderate Disabled Children/Youth (Pre-School/Elem School)  (3)  

Emphasis on selection and implementation of instructional methods including affective and learning behaviors, selection and adaptation of materials to support student learning, behavior, and social adjustment in regular classroom. Prerequisite: ED 302 or SE 610.

SE 632  Methods and Materials for Teaching Mild-Moderate Disabled Children/Youth (Middle School/Secondary)  (3)  

Implementation of comprehensive Individualized Education Program (IEP). Emphasis on selection and implementation of instructional methods including affective and learning behaviors, selection and adaptation of materials to support student learning, behavior, and social adjustment in regular classroom. Prerequisite: ED 302 or SE 610.

SE 635  Conferencing and Consulting in Special Education  (3)  

Introduction of counseling and communication skills to develop multidisciplinary approaches to work with parents and other professionals to secure supportive school/home environments for exceptional children. Prerequisite: ED 302 or SE 476 and SE 610.

SE 640  Individual and Group Management for Children and Youth with Mild-Moderate Disabilities  (3)  

Principles and applications of individual and group management techniques for youth with mild/moderate disabilities. Methods of targeting behaviors through positive management procedures stressed, various theoretical approcahes and practical techniques.

SE 655  Special Education Practicum  (4)  

Directed and supervised intensive teaching experiences with children with mild/moderate disabilities in educaitonal settings which include elementary age children. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching.

SE 656  Special Education Practicum I (Pre-Elementary)  (2, 3)  

Directed and supervised intensive teaching experiences with children with mild/moderate disabilities in educaitonal settings which include pre-school/elementary age children. Prerequisite: SE 610, SE 620 (or concurrent).

SE 657  Special Education Practicum II (Pre-Elementary)  (2, 3)  

Interrelated teaching experiences with students with mild/moderate disabilities. Prerequisite: SE 656 and 18 hours of graduate coursework.

SE 658  Special Education Practicum I (Middle/Secondary)  (2, 3)  

Directed and supervised intensive teaching experiences with children with mild/moderate disabilities in educational settings which include middle school and secondary age children. Prerequisite: SE 610, SE 620 (or concurrent classified as educable mentally handicapped learning enrollment in SE 622).

SE 659  Special Education Practicum II (Secondary)  (2, 3)  

Interrelated teaching experiences with students with mild/moderate disabilities. Prerequisite: SE 658 and 18 hours of graduate coursework.

SE 660  Assessment in Special Education (Pre-Elementary)  (3)  

Survey and analysis of individual tests, curriculum-based and ecological measures applicable to diagnosing and planning instructional programs for children with mild/moderate disabilities. Emphasis on development of individual portfolios through data collection, administration and interpretation of multi-sources educational information, test results, and personal records to develop appropriate curriculum. Stresses use of data in the development of Individualized Educational Plans. (Fee may be assessed to cover the cost of consumable materials.) Prerequisite: SE 610, SE 620, and consent of instructor.

SE 662  Assessment in Special Education (Middle/Secondary)  (3)  

Survey and analysis of individual tests and curriculum-based measures applicable to diagnosing and planning instructional programs for children with mild/moderate disabilities. Emphasis on developing individual portfolios through data collection, administration and interpretation of multi-sourced educaitonal information, test results, and personal records to develop appropriate curriculum. Stresses use of data in the development of individual educational plans. (Fee may be assessed to cover the cost of consumable materials.) Prerequisite: SE 610, SE 620, and consent of instructor.

SE 663  Exceptionals in Early Childhood Education  (3)  

Focuses on children with disabilities ages birth through grade 3. Emphasis is placed on understanding assessment, uses of technology, working with families, development of IEP.

SE 674  Special Topics in Special Education  (3)  

Topics vary from semester to semester and will be announced in advance. ED 674 may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of Department Chairperson and Instructor.

SE 676  Psychology of the Exceptional Student  (3)  

Historical and current practices relating to the educational characteristics, needs, and placement alternatives for exceptional students. Emphasis on procedure and strategies for teaching exceptional students in the classroom. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

SE 680  Resources for Families with Disabilites  (3)  

Study of the local, state and national resources available to assist childrent with disabilities and their families. Structural characteristics of families is presented to assist students in understanding the needs of individuals with disabilities. Prerequisite: ED 302 or graduate standing.